Dear Supporters,

Our charge at HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is to work tirelessly to assist students, historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). Thank you for your unwavering support throughout the years of our organization’s existence; we were able to make dreams come true. Furthermore, as we continue our mission to remain strong advocates for students and HBCUs, we would like for your continued support to become an HBCU Campaign Donor or Lifesaver in helping us in the longevity fight in strengthening the HBCU space.

Our mission is to fundraise while instituting initiative programming and partnerships in support of HBCUs and their communities. We’ll accomplish those goals by providing scholarships, endowments, and enhancing the significance of those who are supported by our organization.

Our fundraising campaigns are focused on raising funding for students who have financial needs to continue their college education or assist the organization with the necessary financing for providing initiative programming to students and HBCUs, Your contribution is critical and beneficial to many individuals who are supported through HCF who fall short financially. Our goal is to assist as many individuals in need and ensuring that they accomplish their dreams.

We are calling on all HBCU alumni, friends, affinity groups, and supporters of education to help us support students going to college and keep them in college by supporting the HBCU Campaign Fund with a generous gift to continue the proposed dreamed mission.

If you would like to become a donor or an HBCU Campaign Lifesaver, you can make an online donation at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate. You may also donate through Cash App to cashtag $CampaignForHBCUs or send by mail to HBCU Campaign Fund, 12558 S. Princeton Ave, Chicago, IL 60628-7225. Your donation will provide access to the key of education for many students who are achieving their goals to success. We Are HBCUs.

Yours Sincerely,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
President and CEO, Founder
HBCU Campaign Fund

Statement by Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
President and CEO, Founder, HBCU Campaign Fund

America’s issue of racism and hate has transpired for too long over the years. However, recently police brutality has taken a toll more than ever before. Because of the usage of social media, citizens have been informed more about the dreadful impact of racism and hate towards the Black community. The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded to help students and support all Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). We work tirelessly to advocate for students and those institutions we serve in making sure that their voices are heard to virtually continue serving first-generation, and underprivileged students as well as their surrounding neighborhoods.

We have recently witnessed the brutal and uncaused for deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and David McAtee that have shaken our nation and once again demonstrated the heartless discrimination against the Black community.

Our country must continue to unite to dismantle racism and bigotry in all forms and denounce race-related violence and police brutality.

HCF looks forward to joining others and partnering with our nation leaders, HBCUs, and communities we serve in working together to heal our nation on those issues of racism and hate. We must not be silent. As Dr. King once reminded us all: “Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

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About the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF)

HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is a nonprofit advocacy educational organization that is mission to support the significance and raises funds for scholarships, initiative programming, and for public and private HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains today as a strong advocacy for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

The HBCU Presidential Spotlight Series is sponsored by the Office of the President and CEO, Founder Demetrius Johnson, Jr., at HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) introduces chancellors and presidents who currently serves a Historically Black College or University. This initiative recognizes those individuals who serves our nation higher ed institution daily, changing and educating lives while producing the next generation of leaders.

Tony Allen, Ph.D., President of Delaware State University.

Committed to a vision of making Delaware State University the most diverse, contemporary HBCU in America, Tony Allen became the University’s 12th President on January 1, 2020. He succeeded Dr. Wilma Mishoe, the first female chief executive in the institution’s history.

“I consider Delaware State University to be one of the most important institutions in the country,” Tony said on his first day in office. “I don’t choose those words lightly. Few institutions specialize in providing access to a four-year, comprehensive education to students who lack every advantage except sheer determination to do better for themselves and their families.”

Delaware Governor John Carney added, “Tony understands that the University’s role today is helping to build our workforce, while having both a social and economic impact on Delaware.”

Tony had previously served as Delaware State University’s Executive Vice President and Provost since July 2017. As Chief Academic Officer of the nation’s #4 public HBCU (as ranked by US News & World Report), he led a faculty of more than 220 professors in 18 academic departments, serving over 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students.

In two-and-one-half years as Chief Academic Officer, Tony implemented a reorganization of the University’s academic colleges and the professional advising unit. Under his leadership, the University has developed new impact-oriented organizations including the Center for Neighborhood Revitalization and Research and the Center for Global Africa, while materially expanding the institution’s global partnerships in China, Poland, Jamaica, and across Africa.

During that period, the University’s funded research portfolio increased from $19 million to $23 million (7th among HBCUs) and the institution’s chartered Early College High School graduated its first two classes, sending 52% of those students to Delaware State University with an average of 40+ college credits already earned.

He has labored tirelessly to raise public awareness and build or expand new partnerships for Delaware State University. Public and nonprofit endeavors have included the City of Wilmington, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and the Executive Leadership Council. Simultaneously, the University has been expanding corporate partnerships with JPMorgan Chase, Corteva, Exelon, Apple, the FMC Corporation, and many others.

This work has not gone unnoticed. In 2018, Tony received the Campus Compact Mid-Atlantic Civic Leadership in Higher Education Award, and in 2019 the Delaware Barristers Association honored him with its Excellence in Education Award for his “leadership and outstanding contributions to the field of education,” which has “demonstrated a true social commitment to social justice and equality for all.”

Of Tony’s tenure as Provost, Board Chairperson Dr. Devona Williams said, “Tony has materially strengthened our academic and research enterprise. He has a complete understanding of the challenges and opportunities in higher education, and particularly what it takes for students at a Historically Black College or University to succeed in academics, in establishing a career, and in life.”

Previously, Tony led the corporate reputation group at Bank of America and was responsible for developing programming to influential media elites, national social justice advocates, academics and elected officials and their staff at federal and local levels. He was also responsible for ongoing reputation analysis and related research; led communications for the bank’s Consumer, Commercial Banking, and Wealth Management businesses; and co-chaired the Global Marketing & Corporate Affairs Diversity & Inclusion Council. He started his financial services career as an Executive Vice President at MBNA America.

Tony’s career has been primarily characterized, however, by his lifelong commitment to public service, including service as the Founding President of both the Metropolitan Wilmington Urban League and Public Allies Delaware. In the former position, he received the National Urban League’s highest honor, the Whitney M. Young Award for Advancing Racial Equality. From the foundation he provided to Public Allies Delaware, the organization has graduated more than 1,000 young adults as “Allies,” who have provided more than 1 million hours of public service to Delaware communities.

Within the field of public education in Delaware, Tony chaired the Wilmington Education Improvement Commission and its predecessor organization, while also serving on the Board of Directors for the Rodel Foundation. His work there was instrumental in providing the starting point for the newly appointed Redding Consortium for Educational Equity. He currently co-chairs the Greater Kent County Workforce Education and Skills Development Group.

Tony has served twice as the Chairperson for the United Way of Delaware’s $20 million annual charitable campaign, and is Chair Emeritus of the National Urban Fellows. He held a position on the transition teams of both Governors Jack Markell and John Carney, and was a speechwriter for then-U.S. Senator Joe Biden.

He holds a 1993 Bachelor of Arts Degree in Political Science from the University of Delaware and a 1998 Master’s Degree in Public Administration in Nonprofit Management and Community Development from the Austin W. Marxe School of Public and International Affairs, Baruch College (CUNY). He completed his academic journey at the University of Delaware’s Joseph R. Biden Jr. School of Public Policy and Administration by earning a 2001 Ph.D. His dissertation was on “Devolution and Intergovernmental Decision-Making: The Delaware Welfare Reform Experience.”

Over the past 15 years, Tony has been an active scholar and lecturer in the field of public policy and educational reform. In 2002, he began that career with the study Handgun Violence in Delaware for the Urban League and collaborated with Dr. Leland Ware on The Geography of Discrimination: Hyper-segregation, Isolation, and Fragmentation within the Black Community. In the ensuing years, he has contributed multiple articles on similar subjects, including “Much is Required” in the Urban League’s 2017 Report on the State of Black America.

Tony has maintained an active speaking schedule on behalf of Delaware State University and the overarching vision of educational access for all. He recently appeared at the Apple “Educause” Conference in Cupertino, California; keynoted the Ellucian Conference for Historically Black Colleges and Universities; appeared at the National Orientation Director’s Association (NODA) HBCU Summit; and addressed the Middle States Commission on Higher Education (MSCHE), among others. Among his many international appearances, Tony has given the Commencement address at Ningbo University of Technology in China, as well as keynoted the Convocation for Adunkele Ajasin University in Nigeria.

As Tony said in the video released on New Year’s Day 2020, “I am a first-generation college student. My father never completed 11th grade; my mom raised me as a single mother. They believed so strongly in education that it never occurred to me I had any other choice except to go forward as far as talent and opportunity would take me. Providing low-cost, high-quality education not only to the best and the brightest, but especially for those who are locked out or underserved, is not just Delaware State University’s history, it is WHO WE ARE. Our doors always have and will be open to everyone, regardless of skin color, national origin, the god they worship, who they choose to love, or how much money their family makes.”

Why did you want to become a College/University president and why at an HBCU?

I consider Delaware State University to be one of the most important institutions in the country. I don’t choose those words lightly. Few institutions specialize in providing access to a four-year, comprehensive education to students who lack every advantage except sheer determination to do better for themselves and their families.

How does it feel to serve as a College/University President?

It is a unique and high honor and one I take with great humility.

What is your definition of leadership? What have been your leadership priorities as president?

I believe in the power of “WE.” To be successful in any complex enterprise, you have to surround yourself with talented people; given them clear, overarching directives and as many resources as possible; and then set them to work. Initiative and innovation are rewarded, and accountability is essential. Without an environment of mutual personal and professional respect, you can achieve little. I am blessed with an exceptional team at this University at all levels, and sometimes my biggest challenge is to make sure they make time to take care of themselves and their families.

When I was first appointed, I gave everyone my “It all Matters” philosophy. Click here: https://delawarebusinesstimes.com/news/people/90-in-90-tony-allen/.

What does HBCU mean to you? Are the HBCU institutions relevant to the higher education space?

To state my position unambiguously: Delaware State University’s future centers on always embracing our HBCU heritage, and having our actions testify every day that we are among the most important institutions in the world, literally building “a more perfect Union” and educating better global citizens.

Our core mission has not changed in 129 years: find young people who are as bright, energetic and driven as any in the world, and pay special attention to those who don’t realize their power and promise. Provide them an exceptional education and never let them forget where they come from, or the ones who made the sacrifices to give this opportunity. Whether they are Dreamers from Georgia or first-generation students from Georgetown, we are the place to call home.

Last fall, I wrote to the Delaware State community to say that I was profoundly grateful to God for affording me the enormous, life-changing opportunity to serve this University, and to be entrusted with a leadership role in finding our collective place of continued usefulness and honor in the world. For each of us at Delaware State University, doing so requires that we be better tomorrow than we are today, work harder – and smarter – than we have before, and strive without fear… TOGETHER.

What are the three goals you are planning to accomplish for the 2020/2021 academic year?

  1. Growth through innovation – ensuring that we continue to attract talented students from a wide-array of backgrounds on campus, virtually around the world.
  2. Building a culture of unwavering customer service.
  3. Putting the students at the center of everything we do.

How important is it to you for students to receive their education while attending an HBCU?

Today, there is a clear juxtaposition between the enormous possibilities of Black economic and political power and the continued bifurcation of mass incarceration of young Black men, the destabilization of densely populated urban centers and the deeply divisive opportunity gaps and lower wages for African American people writ large. Those tensions are rooted in the prospects of a well-education American citizenry and a belief, or lack thereof, that our country is better positioned for the future if every segment of society sees success as a link to that of their fellow citizens. As such, HBCUs in general, and Delaware State University in particular, play a profoundly substantive role.

What is the most interesting challenges of working as an University President and in the space of higher education?

Taking advantage of the University’s unique assets and identity, pursuing a long-term strategy that offers a big vision for the future, attracting a variety of financial and programmatic stakeholders and balancing a longstanding commitment to underserved and non-traditional students with initiatives that enhance its contributions to scholarship, service, social justice and economic empowerment.

What has been the proudest moments of your presidency so far?

Graduating our first class of DREAMERS. 

As you may know, Delaware State University is the #1 national school of choice for DREAMERS (children of undocumented immigrants under DACA), and we currently enroll about 175 of them. During the Fall of 2017, there was a strong move by the administration to eliminate the protections that DACA has provided these students, most of whom were brought to the United States at an age younger than six, and who have known no other country. Delaware’s senior United States Senator Tom Carper had been—and continues to be—a fierce champion for these students. He came to campus to meet with the Dreamers and update them on the progress of the fight. It was an announced meeting, but not originally intended as a large public gathering. Our students, faculty, and staff decided otherwise, and left classes and offices in the middle of the day in numbers exceeding 1,000 to come out and stand with our Dreamers, to communicate a very simple message: “You are part of our community, our family; we love you and will support you come what may.” I hope to be here for many years, but that expression of love and solidarity may be unmatched in my tenure.

What are the two or three initiatives that most excite you as you look forward to your future as president?

One cannot overstate the power of a community of talented scholars and professionals – students, faculty and staff alike – who make significant and continuing contributions to the world around them and who carry forward the identity and priorities of the university they represent. Delaware State University is such an institution.

Why should students choose to attend your HBCU institution?

Our mission is to produce capable and productive leaders who contribute to the sustainability and economic development of the global community. Done right, this kind of education represents the hope of a great country, because it testifies that people, regardless of where they come from, what they look like, or who they love, can be made equitably competitive in a smaller, more connected world.

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About Delaware State University

DSU enjoys a long history as one of America’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Founded in 1891 as the State College for Colored Students, DSU is proud of its heritage as one of the country’s first land-grant educational institutions. Today, the institution is a welcome center of learning for student from many backgrounds. DSU’s current population includes a 63% African-American enrollment and an increasing number of Caucasian, Hispanic, Asian and other international students. For more information, visit www.desu.edu.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund 

HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is a nonprofit advocacy educational organization that is mission to support the significance and raises funds for scholarships, initiative programming, and for public and private HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains today as a strong advocacy for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

During this uncertain time, every gift makes a difference. #GivingTuesdayNow is an additional way you can extend a helping hand in making a difference in the lives of those who are financially affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

What is Giving Tuesday Now?

#GivingTuesdayNow (May 5) is a global day of unity in response to the unprecedented need cause by the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.


What should you give to HCF during this critical time?

  1. Students’ are negatively impacted by the crisis and are at risk of not being able to continue their educational efforts due to financial need.
  2. Our HBCUs are at risk and negatively impacted by the sudden transition to eliminating face-to-face instruction and moving to online instruction.
  3. The lack of technology for students and HBCUs, for their students’ ability to ensure online classroom connectivity is successful. Such as providing laptop ability.
  4. The cost of managing online classes for smaller HBCUs. This will negatively impact the operational budgets for the forthcoming academic year.
  5. Help support HBCUs who may face revenue loss from several sources due to the elimination of face-to-face instruction.
  6. To ensure that HCF continues to have the resources to do its essential work of supporting students and HBCUs during this global crisis.

What Can You Do to Help?

Donate today by visiting www.hbcucampaignfund.org/donate, and share the donation on social media using #GivingTuesdayNow.

Donate via Mobile Cash App using cash tag $CampaignForHBCUs.

Share the word about our mission and follow #HBCUCampaignFund on Facebook, Twitter @hbcucampaign, and on Instagram.


 

As we continue to go through uncertainty and experience challenges in the result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) organization continues to closely monitor the future scheduling for upcoming events, including football classics and recruitment fairs. Generally, during this time, the Annual HBCU Football and Recruitment Tour scheduling takes place. This year would mark the 5th annual tour, which travels around the nation to support black college sports and join HBCUs in assisting with recruitment efforts. To date, the Indiana Black Expo has announced the cancellation of its Circle City Classic football game and events, an occasion the organization would normally take part of. We will continue to work with our officials and partner football classics; furthermore, we will work to provide an official update of the tour no later than the end of the month of June. Thank you for the unwavering support of this effort and the organization, we truly appreciate the HBCU nation.

With warmest regards,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
President and CEO, Founder
HBCU Campaign Fund

The HBCU Presidential Spotlight Series is sponsored by the Office of the President and CEO, Founder Demetrius Johnson, Jr., at HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) introduces chancellors or presidents who currently serves a Historically Black College or University. This initiative recognizes those individuals who serves our nation higher ed institution daily, changing and educating lives while producing the next generation of leaders.

Dr. Kevin James serves as the Interim President of Morris Brown College, a historically black college located in Atlanta, Georgia founded in 1881. In this role he leads as CEO and is responsible for leadership and management of all aspect of college operations and responsibile for the development and execution of the vision and strategic direction for the college in concert with the Board of Trustees. In his nearly 21-year career as higher education administrator, faculty member, executive business leader, and motivational speaker, Dr. James is committed to improving his community through education and empowerment. He has served in various executive-level roles in higher education and the non-profit sector. Prior to his current post as Interim President, Dr. James served as Interim CEO of the 100 Black Men of America, Inc., Internationally headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. The mission of 100 Black Men of America is to improve the quality of life and enhance educational and economic opportunities for all African Americans. A native of Columbia, S.C., Kevin attended South Carolina State University and earned his bachelor’s degree in Communication Disorders and Social Sciences from Winthrop University; a master’s degree in Business Management Leadership, and Organizational Effectiveness from Troy State University; and a Doctor of Education degree in Higher Education Leadership from Nova Southeastern University. He is also a graduate of the Higher Education Institute at Harvard University.

Why did you want to become a College/University president, and why at an HBCU?

I particularly wanted to work at an HBCU because no other organizations affects the black middle class like these institutions. HBCUs educate the minds of a large percentage of minorities who are going to move this country forward!

At the end – and the beginning – of the day, our work is all about the students. The important work of academic leaders is to assure educational quality and improve institutional effectiveness. My vision is to fully restore Morris Brown and serve as the premier model for shaping and ensuring the quality of higher education throughout the college and community. Ensuring quality through the accreditation process and improving the quality through the accreditation process and improving the quality of the educational product that our academic departments yield, and to safeguard and improve student learning outcomes will be my focus as President, while also ensuring fiscal stability.

How does it feel to serve as a College/University President?

I am honored to have been selected by the Morris Brown Board to serve at the helm of Georgia’s only HBCU started and funded by black people; being named president will allow me to strategize future growth and directions from a longstanding viewpoint. I look forward to continuing this great work in collaboration with the board of trustees, students, staff, alumni, and other shareholders to resurrect this historic college back to prominence. We will continue working to obtain accreditation, ensure financial stability, build a strong relationship with alumni, and grow enrollment through the “Hard Reset.”

What is your definition of leadership? What have been your leadership priorities as president?

“Leadership is influence, nothing more nothing less.” John Maxwell

My priorities as the leader of Morris Brown College have been accreditation, financial stability, and governance.

What does HBCU mean to you? Are the HBCU institutions relevant to the higher education space?

The Higher Education Act of 1965 defines an HBCU as any historically black college or university that was established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans.

HBCUs are synonymous with culture, quality, special attention to black students, diversity, success, the arts, and pride just to name a few. Unlike the other HBCUs operating in Georgia, which benefited from the financial backing of their white founders, Morris Brown College was founded in 1881, when the African Methodist Episcopal Church decided to open a school for black students after the Civil War. It was the first (and only) institution of higher education to be owned and operated by and for African Americans in Georgia, and over the course of the next century, it became a vehicle for advancement within the African American community.

What are three goals you are planning to accomplish for the 2020/2021 academic year?

Three goals that we are planning to accomplish for the 2020/2021 academic year include the following:

  1. Candidacy for accreditation with the Transnational Association of Christian Colleges and Schools
  2. Financial Stability/Increased fundraising
  3. Improved Governance

How important is it to you for students to receive their education while attending an HBCU?

I am an executive leader who is student-centered first and foremost. For this reason, for many years I have wanted to become a President at an HBCU. Under my direction, students, faculty, and staff will be led through transparency and integrity. My style of leadership requires me to be quantifiable, visible in the community, and have an open-door policy. I am approachable and value diversity and multicultural competency. I am bridge builder who has the savvy to bring people together, thereby eliminating silos. Students at Morris Brown will not just be educated, but will be able to compete in this global society against graduates from any institution.

What is the most interesting challenges of working as an College/University President and in the space of higher education?

The most interesting challenge of working as a college president is the number of hats one must wear to be effective. The college presidency is 50 jobs rolled into one. According to an article posted in the Chronicle of Higher Education entitled, “The Toughest Job in the Nation/The College Presidency,” the author argued several points of why the job is challenging. From experience, I agree with many of his perspectives. In the article it was noted that through survey, presidents were asked specifically, what frustrated them. The top frustration among both pubic and private college leaders was the lack of financial resources. This has been Morris Brown’s number one issue. Additionally, college presidents answer to a very large number of outspoken constituencies including students, staff, faculty, trustees, alumni, and in many cases, political leaders – none of which can be ignored. My most interesting challenges of being Morris Brown College President has been resolving problems with no resources. It has been challenging; however, we have been successful thus far. I believe, if there is will, then there is a way.

What has been the proudest moments of your presidency so far?

The proudest moments of my presidency so far has been the wins that have pushed us closer to fully restoring the institution. We are excited about the future of Morris Brown College. Morris Brown has made wonderful progress within the last thirteen months. The state’s approval (Georgia Nonpublic Postsecondary Education Commission {GNPEC}, which authorizes and regulates the operations of in-state nonpublic and out-of-state postsecondary colleges and schools operating or offering instruction in Georgia) is a clear sign that Morris Brown College is headed in the right direction and gaining momentum for its future. Moreover, we have led negotiations with the AME church to remove a 4.2 million-dollar debt which clears a pathway towards accreditation. Moreover, MBC has received over 1 million dollars in grant funding toward the restoration of iconic Fountain Hall. Additionally, the institution has made tremendous progress with accreditation, governance, rebranding of the institution, partnerships, and fiscal stability. We have provided bold leadership to address problems.

What are the two or three initiative that most excite you as you look forward to your future as president?

I am excited about Morris Brown Colleges’ future. We will continue working to obtain accreditation, ensure financial stability, build a strong relationship with alumni, and grow enrollment through “The Hard Reset.”

To accomplish our goals, we have identified six strategic priorities:

  1. Institutional Sustainability: through gaining accreditation and developing sustainable resources that enable the achievement of the College’s mission.
  2. Strategic Enrollment Management: by practicing effective enrollment management to optimize student access, retention, program completion and success through relevant programming, high-quality instruction, and comprehensive educational support services;
  3. Organizational Excellence: through promoting an organizational culture that encourages excellence and success by developing and supporting individuals, teams, and processes that contribute to the effective and responsible management of teaching and learning, student success, human resources, facilities, services, technology, and finances;
  4. A Market Response Institution with Innovative Academic Programs by strengthening existing market-relevant programs and developing workforce development, continuing education, and professional education programs to prepare its students with 21st century skills;
  5. Technology and Integrated Learning Space: by strengthening our technology infrastructure to provide educational and workforce opportunities, improve student access and utilization, and advance the College’s operational effectiveness; and
  6. Maximizing Strategic Partnership Opportunities: by expanding our brand, which is mission critical to ensure the success and sustainability of our institution, as strategic partnership opportunities are pivotal to increasing our visibility in the community and scaling reach and impact.

Why should students choose to attend your HBCU institution?

Morris Brown College is truly at a crossroad in its history. The institution is diligently working to reemerge to its prominence, utilizing strategic planning, which will lead to accreditation and sustainability. Morris Brown’s goal is to become a candidate for accreditation by October 2020. if selected as a candidate school, the institution will be eligible to apply for Title IV Funding (Federal Aid) for students. The College is proud of its tradition of serving the educational needs of the best and brightest young minds, while simultaneously providing educational support to students who might not otherwise receive the opportunity to compete on the college level. New students will be a part of a rich legacy and literally be part of history as Morris Brown College is fully restored!

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About Morris Brown College

Morris Brown College provides educational opportunities in a positive and nurturing environment that will enable its students to become fully functional persons in the global society. The College prepares graduates to live meaningful and rewarding lives, thereby enabling them to make socially constructive and culturally relevant contributions to society. For more information, visit www.morrisbrown.edu.

About the HBCU Campaign Fund

HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) is a nonprofit advocacy educational organization that is mission to support the significance and raises funds for scholarships, initiative programming, and for public and private HBCUs and MSIs. HCF remains today as a strong advocacy for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) Division of Alumni Relations and Division of Development & Finance announces the kick-off of its annual three-month “I Love My HBCU” Campaign beginning on Thursday, March 12, 2020, through Friday, June 12, 2020. Sampled by the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) and Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU), I Love My HBCU month was created to encourage alumni and friends of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to give to their institutions as a way to demonstrating their affinity. HCF is initiating its campaign beginning March each year, which will identify alumni ambassadors who can speak upon their HBCU experience, why they love their HBCU and encourage others to donate to an HBCU or HCF during their campaign months.

“We are so excited to announce another year of our annual “I Love My HBCU” Alumni Campaign this year. The goal is to reach $15,000 donated to HBCUs and $10,000 alone to HCF in the duration of the three-months to financially assist students and our nation jewels in this much crucial time,” said Demetrius Johnson, Jr., President and CEO, Founder at HBCU Campaign Fund. “Again, we are asking for all HBCU alums to join us in making a minimum gift for the founding year of their HBCU alma mater, or another HBCU which will commemorate the year that the institution was established. If we can get the momentum of donating that amount going, that will assist in surpassing the minimum set-goal and keep student-success going. HCF will also highlight those alums who’ve given on our social media and communication handles in token of appreciation of their contribution while also encouraging others to participate.”

Alumni who participate in the three-month campaign will be recognized on HCF’s website and communication platforms, speaking on the value of their HBCU experience, why they love their institution, and encouraging others to donate. When sharing on social media, the official hashtag is #HCFILoveMyHBCU. [Please note before participants are highlighted, they must submit a substantial donation or contribution receipt in pdf or jpg format as proof showing that they’ve donated their HBCU or HBCU of choice dated between March 12, 2020, and June 12, 2020, or either has donated HCF. Emailed receipts are accepted. Monies generated in this campaign will go to the institution’s Foundation/Institutional Advancement offices, HCF Scholarship Fund, or HCF Unrestricted Fund that serves the primary organization’s needs. The unrestricted fund at HCF allows flexibility to make an immediate impact on the organization’s needs in its advocacy and aid for HBCUs and MSIs at any moment. HCF’s ultimate hope is that alumni enroll in the recurring gift programs at their HBCUs.

Incentives and gifts are planned to be available to donors who participate and give toward the campaign from HCF. Everyone who donates will receive an HCF “I Love My HBCU” button. Those who gift $50 will receive a limited edition “I Love My HBCU” pennant. Those who gift $100 or more will receive an HCF “I Love My HBCU” pennant, button, and a t-shirt with the name of the HBCU of their choice on the back.

To participate in the campaign, please visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org/divisions/alumnirelations/ilovemyhbcu to complete the necessary form.

For further questions or concerns, contact HCF at 773-988-2106 or via email at support@hbcucampaignfund.org.

CHICAGO, IL (February 4, 2020) – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) would like to congratulate and announce six newly elected members of its Board of Directors.

The members were appointed by Dr. Santarvis Brown, Chairman of the Board in November 2019. Their experience and guidance will help our organization growth and strengthen our advocacy efforts to assist students, HBCUs and MSIs.

“I am pleased to welcome these exceptional leaders to our organization’s Board of Directors. Our organization is known for its national-wide advocacy in the HBCU space, as we move forward to assisting students and further strengthening HBCUs. I look forward to the fresh perspectives and valuable insight of our new board members as we continue our commitment to our students, partner institutions, and the community,” said Demetrius Johnson, Jr., President and CEO, Founder at HBCU Campaign Fund.

The newly elected members include the following:

  • Dr. Derek Anderson (Vice Chairman), President, Central State University Foundation
  • Dr. Pamela Richardson Wilks (Secretary), Chief of Staff & Assistant to the President for Strategic Initiatives, Edward Waters College
  • Dr. Angela Graham-Williams (Treasurer), Executive Director, FAFF Place Residential Youth Care Facility
  • Dr. Braque Talley, Vice Chancellor of Enrollment Management and Student Success, University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff
  • Dr. Colette P. Burnette, President and CEO, Huston-Tillotson University
  • Steven Onukwuli, Director, Prichard Boys & Girls Club of America (Not pictured)

“The HCF Board of Directors provides critical leadership and decision-making which are vital to presenting a unified voice in our advocacy efforts to the HBCU space. We are privileged to have such a committed and talented group of leaders at the helm of our organization, and we anticipate that the diverse experience our new board members bring will add significant value,” said Dr. Santarvis Brown, Chairman of the Board.

For more information about the Board of Directors, visit our website at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/aboutus/boardofdirectors.

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About HBCU Campaign Fund

Founded in 2012, HCF is the vision and brainchild of founder Demetrius Johnson, Jr. In 2015, HCF incoporated its mission to supporting the significance and raising funds for scholarships and services at HBCUs and MSIs. HCF today remain as a strong advocate for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

 

 

Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) are institutions of higher learning that were established on or before 1964 with the intentions of making education available for freed slaves. Today, many of those institutions continue to grasp that value while also serving minority and diverse populations. HBCUs are dominant to the higher education sector, uplifting and playing the role as backbone institutions.

For more than 140-years in history, HBCUs are studied to having a student-centered background. Faculty and staff are categorized to provide a nurturing family-oriented atmosphere. HBCUs are also considered to have become institutions that serve low-income, first-generation, and academically underprepared students. Though those students were previous or are label as “at risk of not entering or completing college,” however, HBCUs continue to strive to maintain their beliefs and mission to turning those students into scholarly leaders.

The majority of the nation’s HBCUs were established independently by an educator, slave, or black founded church and then turned over to the state because of economic conditions; it is essential that we take an active interest in giving back and supporting their missions. Today, there are various ways to give, but the most vital needs are monetary. There has been a calling for years for all alumni, Greeks, supporters, corporations, and organizations.

Each year, state and federal appropriations are frequently cut from various HBCUs and Minority-Serving Institutions, subject by state. The first institutions targeted are HBCUs or MSIs, and for multiple reasons play a much factor in the decision. Also, each year chancellors and presidents come before law markers to ask for continuous monetary support for their institutions.

Though your giving will not support the total institution expenses and operational costs, however, it will be meaningful to assisting a student and providing a reduction toward their educational cost. When you invest in higher education, specifically an HBCU, you are paying back homage to those who died advocating for African-Americans to have an education. Even if you do not support monetary wise, you can contribute to other ways, which include; recruiting, supporting athletics, and positively promoting your favorite HBCU.

Your contributions will attract others who may have an interest in supporting, prospective students, and legislators that will be mindful of how your HBCU existence is well needed in today’s society. And, in this day and time, your support is much needed and well appreciated. Always remember, your HBCU institution was there by your side since day one, molding you into the scholar and leader that you presently are today. It academically prepared you to step into life after college, the working world.

Note that there are corporate organizations and foundations support HBCUs; UNCF, TMCF, Tom Joyner Foundation, HBCU Campaign Fund, and Club 1964, Inc. Visit your HBCU’s official website and find more information on ways to give directly.

I genuinely appreciate your support of our HBCUs and MSIs. Let’s keep them alive; we shall not close the doors of another historically black institution.

CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) cordially invites Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) to participate in part of its Supported Institution of the Month Initiative Program for the year 2020 and 2021.

The Supported Institution of the Month program is intended as a monthly awareness and another avenue of advertisement for HBCUs and MSIs, which targets the areas of academic excellence, fundraising, recruitment, and student success.

The program will annually select twelve (12) partner schools with support from HCF. The partner schools will be exposed to the organization’s audience and support system socially and publicly as well as given the opportunity to be advocated by taking over HCF’s social media handles (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn, WordPress, and Website) for a month.

During the partner schools month, HCF will aim awareness towards student success, recruitment, and fundraising (if the school has chosen to agree to through its institutional advancement or foundation office).

The partner school will be assigned a partnership page on the organization’s website, dedicated to its designated month. The page will include academic and student success, student spotlights, alumni spotlights, the institution’s history, recruitment information, admissions link, and information provided for donating through its institutional advancement or foundation office. HCF will designate a hashtag for social media engagement.

TIMELINE – Partner schools will be selected in three parts:

  • Interest institutions must submit an application via the organization’s website at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/programs/supportedinstitutions. Deadline is no later than January 17, 2020.
  • January 2020: all submitted applications and proposals for the year 2020 will be reviewed. The partner schools advancing in the process will be notified.
  • January 2020: the organization will make an official announcement of the selected partner schools for the year 2020.
  • February-March 2020: all submitted applications and proposals for the year 2021 will be reviewed. The partner schools advancing in the process will be notified.
  • April 2020: the organization will make an official announcement of the selected partner schools for the year 2021.

Individuals may request the Supported Institution of the Month Initiative Program Handbook or electronic application by email to djohnsonjr@hbcucampaignfund.org. You may also direct any questions that rise to the following email as well.

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About HBCU Campaign Fund

Founded in 2012, HCF is the vision and brainchild of founder Mr. Demetrius Johnson, Jr. In 2015, HCF incorporated its mission to supporting the significance and raising funds for scholarships and services at HBCUs and MSIs. HCF today remains as a strong advocate for students and higher education. For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.