Five-Year Project Includes Internships, Training and a Traveling Exhibition of Artifacts From the Universities’ Collections

Ayer Hall, which houses the Margaret Walker Center at Jackson State University. Photo courtesy of the Division of Communications and Marketing at the HBCU Campaign Fund.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) announced a partnership with five Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) to enhance their ability to care for and share archives that tell the story of African American and their essential role in American culture and history. The consortium includes Clark Atlanta University, Florida A&M University, Jackson State University, Texas Southern University and Tuskegee University.

The project, led by NMAACH’s strategic partnerships office, features:

  • Internships, fellowship programs and professional training for underrepresented groups to establish a pipeline of museum and archive specialists in the next generation.
  • Assistance in digitizing HBCU collections and creating a digital archive in an easily accessible format for academic scholars and the general public.
  • Development of a traveling exhibition drawing on the most compelling collections from the partner universities that will begin at NMAAHC and then travel to the consortium members and other venues around the country.
The Oaks, the home of Booker T. Washington, first president of Tuskegee University. The home was completed in 1900. Photo courtesy of the Division of Communications and Marketing at the HBCU Campaign Fund.

A launch meeting of the consortium was held virtually March 23, Smithsonian Secretary Lonnie G. Bunch III and NMAAHC Director Kevin Young spoke at the event and were joined by members of the consortium’s advisory committee: National Endowment for the Humanities Acting Chair Adam Wolfson, Institute of Museum and Library Services Director Crosby Kemper III and Johnnetta Cole, former director of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art. Also in attendance were the presidents of the five universities:

  • George French Jr., president of Clark Atlanta University
  • Larry Robinson, president of Florida A&M University
  • Thomas Hudson, president of Jackson State University
  • Kenneth Huewitt, interim president of Texas Southern University
  • Chalotte Morris, interim president of Tuskegee University

“We are honored to be a part of this HBCU initiative with the National Museum of African American History and Culture, and we look forward to all the ways we’ll be able to expand access to the Margaret Walker Center’s collections and ensure their availability for generations to come,” said Dr. Robert Luckett, director of the Margaret Walker Center at Jackson State University, which houses over 40 manuscript collections, more than 2,000 oral histories and other numerous historical assets.

NMAAHC’s strategic partnerships office, established in 2012 (four years before the museum opened), explores issues facing HBCUs and identifies ways to strengthen and sustain their museums, archives and libraries. Outreach programs such as the consortium as part of NMAAHC’s core mission. More information can be found on the office’s website.

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About the NMAAHC
Since opening Sept. 24, 2016, the National Museum of African American History and Culture has welcomed over 7 million visitors. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the national’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

The day of March 24th was an historic moment in higher education, specifically for our historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs). I am very thankful for those who serve as dominant advocates for our HBCUs and of our government officials – federal, state, and local who continuously fight for equity funding and resources for HBCUs. Additionally, I am overly grateful for those who proudly stand on the impact of our HBCUs in the state of Maryland. Maryland is home to four HBCUs that include: Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore.

After fifteen years of battling for equal rights of better state funding that will bring much-needed support to carry on with a high-quality education at the Maryland’s four HBCUs. The battle is only one step further with $577 million over a decade we will accept; however, it is still not equitably enough. Let’s continue the fight for MORE. We applaud House Speaker Adrienne Jones and Senator Charles Sydnor for their willingness in leading this effort to the resolution of this long-standing lawsuit of what defines brighter days for our institutions. Also, I applaud the Legislative Black Caucus for their efforts in this resolution as well.

On March 24th, Bowie State University welcomed Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, along with Senate President Bill Ferguson and House Speaker Adrienne Jones, for the official signing of the legislation lawsuit. As a result of the $577 HBCU Settlement Bill, Morgan State University will receive $24 million, Bowie State $16.7 million, Coppin State University $9 million, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore $9.7 million in state funds in the fiscal year 2023, and at least $9 million annually thereafter, through the fiscal year 2032. The funds in the settlement are expected to be used for scholarships and financial aid support services, as well as faculty recruitment and development. Also, the funds could be used to expand and improve existing academic programs, including online programs, and the development and implementation of new academic programs.

The ongoing efforts to ‘Campaign For HBCUs’ will carry on to evolve around the educational landscape of our HBCUs. And the fight for equity funding doesn’t just stop here; however, it will keep going for Maryland HBCUs and all other HBCUs that rely on state funding. In the words of President Breaux, HBCUs will continue to be a beacon of hope and promise for those seeking to improve their families and communities through public higher education. And the HBCU Campaign Fund will always advocacy, support and commend the roles of our HBCUs and their vigorous leaders, faculty, and staff.

I am proud to say that truly, We Are HBCUs!

MEMPHIS, TN (Feb. 10, 2021) – FedEx Corp. (NYSE: FDX) announced today a pledge to commit $5 million to four Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in Mississippi and Tennessee. The initiative will create valuable education and job readiness for students at Tennessee State University, Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University, and LeMoyne-Owen College.

The initiative is a collaborative effort among FedEx and each school designed to help prepare students for the workforce beyond formal education. A portion of the multi-year commitment will be used to offer relief support to help students, faculty, and staff at each school who have suffered adverse economic impact due to COVID-19.

“With many students and families struggling right now as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, our hope is that this timely investment will help keep more students in school and provide future access to leadership, educational and employment opportunities,said Judy Edge, corporate vice president of Human Resources at FedEx. “This contribution further deepens our commitment to creating more equitable communities by breaking down barriers to work and making a sustainable, long-term impact on underrepresented groups.”

This new initiative builds on the longstanding relationship between these HBCUs and FedEx, which includes endowed scholarships at Jackson State University, Tennessee State University and LeMoyne-Owen College; a customized career readiness program established at Mississippi Valley State University; and leadership summits in support of the Southern Heritage Classic for students at both Tennessee State University and Jackson State University.

Today’s announcement reinforces the company’s longstanding commitment to advancing inclusion and empowering economic opportunity in the Black community. Through skills training programs, mentoring, and collaboration with leading national and local organizations, FedEx is focused on making the communities it serves more equitable, helping empower diverse voices, and providing access to leadership, educational and employment opportunities.

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About FedEx Corp
FedEx Corp. (NYSE: FDX) provides customers and businesses worldwide with a broad portfolio of transportation, e-commerce and business services. With annual revenue of $75 billion, the company offers integrated business solutions through operating companies competing collectively, operating collaboratively and innovating digitally under the respected FedEx brand. Consistently ranked among the world’s most admired and trusted employers, FedEx inspires its nearly 600,000 team members to remain focused on safety, the highest ethical and professional standards and the needs of their customers and communities. To learn more about how FedEx connects people and possibilities around the world, please visit about.fedex.com.

Hope Enterprise Corporation, Goldman Sachs, Southern HBCUs and Cities launch the Deep South Economic Mobility Collaborative to dismantle economic inequality

JACKSON, MS – Hope Enterprise Corporation has announced a $130 million commitment from Goldman Sachs, has partnered with seven cities, and nine historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) to launch the Deep South Economic Mobility Collaborative (DSEMC). Formed to stabilize and strengthen businesses and communities devastated by the economic crisis, DSEMC is an innovative collaborative that invests in the power of small businesses and entrepreneurs in the Deep South, particularly those from underserved and under-resourced communities.

DSEMC taps the expertise and capabilities of Hope Enterprise Corporation, Goldman Sachs, institutions of higher learning and cities in a unique way to provide access to financing, business education classes, and business support services, leveraging support from the private, public and nonprofit sectors. This comprehensive support focuses on stabilizing and strengthening small businesses, and bolstering employment in a region characterized by deep, entrenched poverty and racial disparities.

“For centuries, racism and economic inequality has thwarted human and economic potential in the Deep South, but our story doesn’t end there,” said Bill Bynum, HOPE CEO. “Equipped with opportunity and the right tools, people of this region can accomplish anything. Fueled by their resilience, and harnessing the collective resources of DSEMC, together we will knock down the barriers facing underserved businesses and communities in a way that has never been done before. The collaborative will help build a more inclusive economy that will yield benefits now and for future generations.”

“Black businesses ownership is a proven way to advance economic mobility,” said Margaret Anadu, Goldman Sachs Partner and Head of the Urban Investment Group. “Goldman Sachs has a long history of building up Black and women-owned businesses through 10,000 Small Business and by investing in Community Development Financial Institutions like HOPE. The Deep South Economic Mobility Collaborative reflects our ongoing commitment to invest deeply in strategies to close the racial wealth gap.”

While the DSEMC is open to all small businesses, the impact of the pandemic and economic crisis has disproportionately harmed communities of color. Recent research shows that between February and mid-April of 2020, 41% of Black businesses had permanently closed, compared to 17% of white-owned businesses. Furthermore, the value of Black businesses in the Deep South is lower than in any other part of the country, underscoring the urgent need for solutions in a region with the highest percentage of Black residents.

“Partnering with the world’s preeminent investment bank will anchor Miles College as the incubator for Black owned businesses and entrepreneurs in our region,” said Bobbie Knight, Miles College President. “This alliance with Goldman Sachs and Hope Credit Union will create a groundbreaking impact and support the next generation for entrepreneurs.”

Through the collaborative, each partner brings unique capabilities and years of experience, and all are passionate about promoting economic opportunity in their communities. Participating municipalities are Birmingham and Montgomery in Alabama; Little Rock, Arkansas, Baton Rouge and New Orleans in Louisiana; Jackson, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee. Participating HBCUs are Alabama State University, Miles College, Philander Smith College, Dillard University, Southern University and A&M College, Xavier University of Louisiana, Jackson State University, Tougaloo College, and LeMoyne-Owen College.

Projections call for the DSEMC to serve 4-5,000 businesses and support 30,000 employees and their family members while improving conditions in Deep South communities to further Black economic mobility.

To learn more about the Deep South Economic Mobility Collaborative, visit www.hopecu.org/mobility.

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About HOPE
HOPE(Hope Enterprise Corporation, Hope Credit Union and Hope Policy Institute) provides financial services; aggregates resources; and engages in advocacy to mitigate the extent to which factors such as race, gender, birthplace and wealth limit one’s ability to prosper. Since 1994, HOPE has generated more than $2.9 billion in financing that has benefitted more than 1.7 million people in Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Tennessee. For more information, visit www.hopecu.org.

About Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses
Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses is an investment to help entrepreneurs create jobs and economic opportunity to providing greater access to education, capital and business support services. To date, more than 9,100 business owners have graduated from the program across all 50 states in the US, Puerto Rico and Washington, D.C.

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) – Several organizations from across the country are set to participate in the President-Elect Joe Biden and Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris events to celebrate their inauguration.

On January 19th, The Presidential Inaugural Committee will host an evening celebration to honor all within the Black Community and African Diaspora, featuring powerful speakers, inspiring stories, and entertaining performances, including historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) marching bands. This event is called We Are One and will be a virtual event; will include our recently named Most Dominant HBCU Leader of 2021 Tennessee State University President and Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. International President and CEO Dr. Glenda Glover and Vice President-Elect Harris is also slated to speak.

The PIC is led by Delaware State University President Dr. Allen, who has known the President-Elect and his family for 25 years – four years of which he served as a special assistant and speechwriter for the then-U.S. Senator Biden in the late 1990s.

The event will be hosted by Terrance J and feature appearances by Leslie Jones, Frankie Beverly, Stacey Abrams, Whip Jim Clyburn, Rep. Cedric Richmond, Congressional Black Caucus Chairwoman Rep. Joyce Beatty, Senator Cory Booker, Senator-Elect Rev. Raphael Warnock, Kim Fields, Erika Alexander and Jason George. It will also feature a special performance by Tobe Nwigwe, in addition to performances by DJ D-Nice, The O’Jays, Rapsody, Step Afrika, the String Queens, the Texas Southern University Debate Team, and more.

This event will also include a Battle of the HBCU Bands, featuring Florida A&M University Marching 100, Grambling State University World Famed Marching Band, Jackson State University Sonic Boom of the South, Louisiana Leadership Institute All-Star Marching Band, South Carolina State University Marching 101, Southern University Human Jukebox, and the Tennessee State University Aristocrat of Bands.

“We are incredibly honored that the Sonic Boom was asked to join in such a historic occasion. This is a significant opportunity and unforgettable moment for our students in the band program,” said Thomas K. Hudson, Jackson State University President in a statement. “We are truly proud of the work they do on and off the field, and this special performance is a reflection of their commitment to their craft.”

“Even in a pandemic, the World Famed will showcase its talent on a platform that will be seen across the globe,” said Rick Gallot Jr., Grambling State University President in a statement. “We are proud that they will be representing the institution for the inauguration of the first HBCU graduate to serve as Vice President of the United States of America.”

We Are One will steam live on Tuesday, January 19th at 8:00 p.m. at bideninaugural.org and Urban One, HBCU Grad, NowThis, Revolt TV, The Source, The Shade Room, BET, The Grio TV, Daily Kos, Watch The Yard, Blavity, and on NBC Peacock TV – on The Choice, which is Peacock’s free, exclusive news channel. You can also visit bideninaugural.org for a full schedule of other events surrounding the inauguration of the 46th President and 48th Vice President of the United States.

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Dear HCF supporter,

Thank you for all you’ve done to support higher education with us throughout 2020. It has been a challenging year, but because of your support, HCF has never stopped advocating for students, HBCUs, and MSIs during these unprecedented times. So many of them have milestones to celebrate this holiday season, thanks to you.

With your help, our advocacy will go a lot further in 2021 when assisting students and supporting higher education. Doing what we do requires a great deal of generosity and dedication with a hand from passionate supporters like you. Without you, setting forth dreams cannot be made possible. When you give to HCF, your generosity works twice as hard and will significantly impact the work that we do.

Make a year-end gift today

As an HBCU Campaigner, you help change the lives of brilliant young people who are shaped into scholars determined to stay in college and succeed to become achievers. You help HBCU and Minority-Serving Institutions to stay open and continue providing a high-quality education to their specific populations. Please consider making a year-end contribution to allow HCF to push even further and help more students, HBCUs, and MSIs who need us most.

Thank you for joining the continued fight to Campaign for HBCUs!

With appreciation,

Demetrius Johnson Jr.
President and CEO, Founder
HBCU Campaign Fund

Talladega College President Dr. Billy C. Hawkins (left) is presented a plaque in recognition of being named No. 1 among the 10 Most Dominant HBCU Leaders for 2020 by the HBCU Campaign Fund. Demetrius Johnson Jr., Fund president and CEO, made the presentation.

(TALLADEGA, AL) – When the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) named Talladega College President Dr. Billy C. Hawkins No. 1 among the 10 Most Dominant HBCU Leaders for 2020, the Fund’s president and CEO, Demetrius Johnson Jr., planned to hand deliver a commemorative plaque to the honoree.

Due to the pandemic, Johnson postponed his trip to Talladega College for nearly 10 months.

Fortunately, he was recently able to present the prestigious award to Hawkins and tour the college campus. Johnson said the positive changes on campus were among the reasons Hawkins was named the No. 1 Most Dominant HBCU Leader for 2020.

“The top 10 leaders were chosen for their influence and their continuous progress moving their institutions forward,” said Johnson. “Dr. Hawkins was named first on our list become of the way in which he has transformed Talladega College.

“Under his leadership, the college has achieved record-high enrollment for three consecutive years, constructed three new buildings and launched its first-ever graduate program — a Master of Science in computer information systems,” Johnson continued.

Johnson also praised Hawkins for his leadership he has provided for other HBCUs.

Hawkins serves as chair of the 37 presidents of member institutions for the UNCF (United Negro College Fund) board of directors and also serves as UNCF chair of the executive committee of member institutions, vice chair of the corporate board and vice chair of the corporate board executive committee.

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About Talladega College
Talladega College, Alwww.hbcucampaignfund.orgabama’s first private historically black college, is consistently ranked among the best southeastern colleges and top HBCUs in the nation. It was founded in 1867 by two former slaves, Williams Savery and Thomas Tarrent, and is the home of the renowned Hall Woodruff Amistad Murals. For more information, visit www.talladega.edu.

About HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF)
The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) was founded in 2012 and is a nonprofit educational organization that remain as a strong advocate for students and higher education. HCF mission is to support the significance and raise funds for scholarships, programs, and private and public Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs). For more information, visit www.hbcucampaignfund.org.

Because of your continuous generous support of the HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF), you have given us so many reasons to say “Thank You“.

Without your – encouragement, volunteering, hospitality during campus visits, picture moments, read or share our content, donations, in-kind support, etc., HCF could not continue to advocate for students and higher education. You are indeed a special person to all of us at HCF, including our constituents – we are grateful that we can always count on your support.

When you support HCF, you make many success stories possible. We cannot stress enough how we cannot do the work that we do without you, and we are so very grateful for your support.

From all of us at the HBCU Campaign Fund, and all of the students, HBCUs, and MSIs who benefit from the advocacy, thanks to YOU, happy holidays!

With appreciation,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
President and CEO, Founder

(12/16/20) – TikTok announced $1 million in funding to eight HBCUs as a part of their ongoing commitment to healthcare workers and academic institutions that serve underrepresented students with programs focused on public health professions in the medical and healthcare fields. The social media platform donated a total of $10 million to 10 academic institutions, including 8 HBCUs that serve minority students. Each school will receive $1 million in funding to support undergraduate and graduate scholarships for students pursuing medical careers or other health related fields, helping to ensure the success of future Black, Latinx, and Indigenous health heroes.

The gifts benefits Xavier University of Louisiana, Tougaloo College, North Carolina Central University, North Carolina A&T State University, South Carolina State University, Laredo College, University of South Dakota, Florida A&M University, Delaware State University, and Virginia Union University.

“Healthcare workers are the heroes of the global pandemic, and deserving heroes within the TikTok community,” said Belinda Frazier, Head of Culture and Diversity, TikTok North America. “The TikTok Health Heroes Relief Fund was created to support their efforts and we are honored to be able to continue our commitment to the healthcare community. We believe the next generation of health heroes should be reflective of the world around us and we are proud of support medical and health education programs that serve Black, Latinx, and Indigenous students.”

2020 has been a difficult year for many, but through it all there’s been an unwavering symbol of hope and humanity shining through: healthcare workers. From epidemiologists to doctors to surge staff, front line healthcare workers are deserving heroes across the country – and theses health heroes are equally lauded figures within the TikTok community, which is part of why TikTok donated $150 million earlier this year through the Health Heroes Relief Fund.

“Many Xavierites have excelled to become the health heroes that are in high demand during the global pandemic,” said Reynold Verret, President of Xavier University of Louisiana. “This gift from TikTok allows talented young women and men with dreams to sharpen their gifts and succeed at becoming change agents in our community and across the nation through education.”


“We are grateful to TikTok for recognizing the power of everyday health heroes like the one we are developing on our campus in combattling the COVID0-19 pandemic. The University’s Public and Allied Health Department, chaired by Dr. Robert C. Mason, and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Michelle Fisher RN managed a small army of employee and student volunteer who came out every test day – rain or shine – to administer the 35,000 tests necessary to keep us all safe. There were dozens of them on duty every day, and these are our heroes.”

– Dr. Tony Allen, President of Delaware State University

According to a 2018 article in Harvard Business Review, Black people make up 13 percent of the US population; but only four percent of US doctors and less than seven percent of US medical students self-identify as Black. In a qualitative study of Black students’ perspectives on careers in medicine in the Journal of the National Medical Association, students reported financial constraints as one of the major barrier in pursuing a career in medicine. We believe investing in the next generation of Black, Latinx, and Indigenous doctors, nurses, pediatricians, surgeons, and other essential health care workers is one of the best ways to invest in the future of America.

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About TikTok
TikTok is the leading destination for short-form mobile video. TikTok’s mission is to inspire creativity and bring joy. For more information, visit www.tiktok.com.

Centers and institutes are important components of the academic, research, and service mission of a college or university. They play an important role in enabling multi-disciplinary and interdisciplinary programs and are a necessary part of a college or university’s infrastructure.

Centers and institutes have the potential for strengthening disciplinary programs by providing interdisciplinary course work, offering service learning opportunities, facilitating certificate programs, supporting degree program, enabling high levels of research productivity and providing external visibility for the college or university.

Here is a list of active Centers and Institutes at HBCUs:

Center for the Study of HBCUs | Virginia Union University

The Center for the Study of HBCUs, in partnership with the Southern Education Foundation (SEF), at Virginia Union University is a national research center whose vision is to become the country’s preeminent institution for the advancement of scholarship on Black colleges in the United States an beyond.

The national research center will conduct high-quality studies, serves as a connection and convener of the HBCU scholarly community, and disseminate publications that focus on the history, mission, and management of HBCUs.

Click here for more information

Center for Social Justice | Claflin University

Claflin’s Center for Social Justice embodies a number of Claflin’s guding principles, most importantly Commitment to Valuing People. At Claflin, people are valued by providing a safe, wholesome and healthy environment that fosters mutual respect, diversity, and inclusion. The Center of Social Justice at Claflin provides a platform of its mission to lead a national movement of change.

Click here for more information

Social Justice Institute | Philander Smith College

The work and mission of Philander Smith College is deeply rooted in social justice and equity – going back to its founding nearly a century and a half ago. Reimagined and reinvented in 2017 with strategic thought partners Auburn Theological Seminary and Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, the institute works to transform the campus, the community and the world.

The Institute seeks to embrace and catalyze work in social justice across multiple domains: education, health, environment, community, economics, politics, identity, civil, criminal, religious, racial, gender, and age.

Click here for more information

Law Center | Southern University System

The mission of the Law Center is consistent with the rich heritage of the Southern University System. The Law Center stresses legal education of high quality for qualified students from diverse backgrounds.

The Southern University Law Center is proud of the tradition established by the original School of Law – to provide quality legal education commensurate with high professional standards. The vision that compels the Law Center to seek excellence in every aspect of its program also fosters an environment that stimulates the intellectual processes and promotes professional development.

The center offers a dual degree Juris Doctor/Masters in Public Administration (JD/MD) program in cooperation with the Nelson Mandela School of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Southern University and A&M College.

Click here for more information

The John R. Lewis Institute for Social Justice | Fisk University

The John R. Lewis Institute is a continuation of the famous Race Relations Institute (RRI), which shaped so many conversation and policies during the 60s and 70s. The social, political, and economic issues that RRI founder Fisk President Charles S. Johnson identified during the 1940s are still critical to addressing and improving the existing disparities in the African American community.

This Institute includes a master’s program in social justice, in addition to certificate programs and undergraduate projects, research and forums.

Click here for more information

Center for Racial Justice | Dillard University

The mission of Dillard University’s Center for Racial Justice (CRJ) is to bring systemic change to the way policies is done in communities of color and to promote partnerships with law enforcement including police departments and sheriff’s office, graduate, and professional schools. The Center for Racial Justice will be a reservoir for lectures, research, advocacy training, civic engagement, and political participation.

Click here for more information

John Mercer Langston Institute for African-American Political Leadership | Virginia State University

The John Mercer Langston Institute for African-American Political Leadership (JMLI) at Virginia State University was created to honor the legacy of John Mercer Langston, the first African American Congressional Representative from Virginia and first president of Virginia State University.

JMLI’s mission seeks to assess, develop, and empower African American political leadership in the Commonwealth of Virginia through innovative programming, research, and advocacy. The Institute strives to promote an increased understanding of the historical significance, unique role and challenges faced by African American political leaders. A highlight of JMLI’s programming is the development and engagement of collegiate scholars who are interested in activism and pursuing careers in political science and public administration.

Click here for more information

– Updated November 9, 2020