ATLANTA, GA – The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (USG) voted Tuesday, April 14, to approve a recommendation of no tuition increase for the 2020-2021 academic year.

The Regents’ action means there will be no increase for any USG student. Students will pay the same tuition rates at all 26 USG institutions for the 2020-2021 academic year as they do now for the current 2019-2020 academic year.

“One of the University System of Georgia’s top priorities is affordability, and that has never been more important than now for our students and their families,” said Steve Wrigley, USG Chancellor. “We are trying to navigate an extraordinary time. It is more critical than ever for our institutions to provide a quality education while maintaining the affordability and accessibility that helps more Georgians attain a college degree and find success in the workforce.”

The University System limited tuition increases among USG institutions to an average 0.9% annually for the past five years, well below the rate of inflation. This is the third time in five years there has been no tuition increase across the University System.

No increase in tuition allows USG to continue to offer some of the lowest tuition rates among peer public higher education systems. Out of 16 states that make up the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) USG has the fourth-lowest in-state tuition and fees for Undergraduates as four-year institutions.

Additionally, only fees related to debt payments or contractual obligations were approved for summer semester.

USG HBCU member-institutions include Savannah State University, Albany State University, and Fort Valley State University.

Tuition rates for each institution may be found here.

ALBANY, GAAlbany State University (ASU) is waving the SAT and ACT scores and the application fee for first-year students applying for the summer and fall 2020 semester. This adaption of the admissions process followed the cancellation of testing services by the College Board. This change was due to the COVID-19 pandemic and authorized by the University System of Georgia. Students will still have to meet other established requirements for admissions.

“Our promise to you, is we will ensure continuity of instruction while ASU participates in online and remote instruction. Campus leadership, faculty and staff are committed to each student’s academic success. That’s the Golden Ran Guarantee,” said Marion Ross Fredrick, president of Albany State University.

ASU has established measures, so students will received the same quality of instruction while they are taking online courses. These measures include:

  • Virtual lectures through Zoom and WebEx
  • Virtual Office Hours daily for all faculty members
  • RAM Central promise to call back 30 minutes after you leave voicemail
  • Virtual studying and tutoring services
  • Virtual Career Services resume critiques, mock interviews and more

Additionally, the ASU Foundation is providing the Local Scholars Grant. Students who graduate from one of ASU’s 28 county service area high schools are eligible (based upon availability of funds) to receive this grant.

“In these unprecedented times we ant prospective students to easily apply for admission without any added pressure,” said Kenyatta Johnson, Vice President of enrollment management and student success.

The application deadline for summer enrollment at ASU is May 1 and the fall deadline is June 1. ASU is proud to offer a multitude of programs including certificates, associates, bachelors, masters and a specialist degree.

For additional information about admissions changes and the local scholars grant, please visit ASU admissions here , email: ramcentral@asurams.edu or call 229-500-4358.

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About Albany State University

Albany State University (ASU) is one of Georgia’s diverse, educational gems. Committed to excellence in teaching and learning, the University prepares students to be effective contributors to a globally diverse society. ASU offers 13 post secondary certificate programs and 55 associate, bachelor’s, and master’s and specialist degree programs, many of which are offered fully online. For more information, visit www.asurams.edu.

Dr. Annie Rene Harris Slaughter is a JSU alum and Yazoo County native who now lives in Atlanta. She wants to make sure every student has an opportunity to succeed. Her endowment aims to help undergraduates with college expenses.

JACKSON, MS – Dr. Annie Rene Harris Slaughter earned three degrees from Jackson State University, and now she established a $100,000 endowment in memory of her mother – also an alum – to help undergraduates pursue their academic dreams at their alma mater. Funds will be matched by Title III, according to a press released by the university.

Harris Slaughter, a native of Yazoo County, currently resides in Atlanta. She said Rosetta Tolbert Harris Endowed Scholarships would help defray expenses for eligible candidates. Funds will pay for tuition, textbooks, supplies and other fees included in the cost of education.

“My mother started teaching around 1928. She liked school a lot. She felt that you should have a college education even if you don’t use it for anything but to fall back on. She was particularly concerned about children who lived in rural areas, where she chose to teach,” said Harris Slaughter, who recalled a doctor’s attempted to persuade her grandmother to keep her daughter (Harris Slaughter’s mother) from going back to school.

“He told my grandmother that going to school was the reason my mother head kept hurting,” said Harris Slaughter. “But my mother preserved.” Her grandmother would eventually support her daughter’s decision to go back to school.

Harris Slaughter earned her bachelor’s, master’s and specialist degree from JSU and her doctorate from Indiana University in elementary and early childhood education. She was a longtime elementary teacher in Jackson and taught briefly at IU, Kentucky State and Western Kentucky University. She retired from Atlanta Public School in 2004. She said the endowment is a fitting tribute because her mother “loved helping children and parents in rural areas that other neglected. She was “no nonsense,” but some of her students were household names because her mother spoke about them so often.

Early on, Harris Slaughter described JSU as the “best state school in Mississippi.” She said, “JSU laid the foundation for everything that I w as to become.” She added, “At this point in my life, I want to assist some high school graduates who would not otherwise consider college an an option. I want to make sure young people have an opportunity.”

Also, she said, “When they become actively involved in campus life they will be more apt to go out in the world and become leaders.”

She said her life can be summed up in the words of a song by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson: “If I can help somebody… my living shall not be in vain.”

To be eligible, scholarship candidates must meet the following criteria:

  • Be an undergraduate student attending Jackson State University
  • Reside in a residence hall on campus
  • Participate in one or more campus-life organizations
  • Maintain a 2.00 GPA or above
  • Be an African-American first-generation college student
  • Be a resident of Yazoo County in Mississippi (priority will be given to students who attended Linwood Elementary School)

Harris Slaughter’s desire now is to see more people support JSU through endowments and scholarships – especially since many African-American leaders graduated from HBCUs.

“People don’t need a handout as much as they need a hand-up,” she said.

 

Welcome newly HBCU Freshman to the experience! It’s that time… Welcome to college at a HBCU!

The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) organization would like to share a few tips with you to make sure that you are mentally prepared for your first year and for the years to come until you’ve walked across the stage.

  1. Go to Class! The first class period is very important; missing the first class deprives you of critical information regarding course assignments and expectations.
  2. Set ground rules with your roommate. You’ll never regret knowing exactly where both of you stand.
  3. Be considerate of your roommate. Selfishness has no place at college.
  4. Set a goal for your grade point average (GPA).
  5. Know the names of all your professors and where their offices are located.
  6. Get to know your academic adviser. Be sure to make your first contact during the first weeks of the semester.
  7. Find the quietest place on campus and visit it for three hours, three times a week.
  8. Develop a sense of belonging, get involved, and make friends. Join a student organization.
  9. Know where you can receive academic assistant, i.e., writing labs, computer labs, tutoring.
  10. Get plenty of sleep! Sleep is very important. Staying up until 3:00 a.m. could begin to take its toll with missing morning classes.
  11. Always have a classmate or tutor read over a paper before submitting it.
  12. Be very careful about disobeying University rules. CHEATING and DRUG USE will get you expelled.
  13. Be prepared for some homesickness. It will go away soon.
  14. Keep lines of communication open. Talk with parents, friends and teachers. Use e-mail and text! (Only if you like to text)
  15. Complete the financial aid (FAFSA) application early (beginning in October and as late as April) – Failure to complete could cost you to lost the big bucks that you were suppose to be eligible for to help you pay for your tuition.
  16. Treat other students around campus with respect! You want to be treated the same way.
  17. Fully understand: “You are responsible for your actions.” You will have an incredible amount of freedom – DO NOT abuse it!
  18. This is NOT high school! Be prepared to work hard!

(Partially adapted from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff and Jackson State University)

Good luck, and please stay connected with the HBCU Campaign Fund informing us on how your HBCU experience is going!

FullSizeRenderFRANKFORT, KY – Kentucky State University (KSU) has announced that the university is making college more affordable for students by partnering with Pearson, a New York-based learning company, to offer e-textbooks to all KSU students for a flat fee. While Pearson has agreed to offer a flat fee, KSU has offered to cover the other half by providing a book scholarship to every student, which means the books are free.

“Some traditional textbooks can cost anywhere from $100 to $300 apiece. And the fact is, some students simply cannot afford to buy all the textbooks required for their course load,” said Aaron Thompson, Ph.D., interim president, Kentucky State University. “We want our students to be successful, and numerous studies have shown that if students do not have their books during the first few days of school, their success rate is seriously diminished.”

While many institutions have leveraged digital course materials delivery models at the individual course level, KSU is one of the only two institutions in the country and is the only institution in Kentucky currently working with Pearson to delivery course material digitally college-wide, to undergraduate to graduate level students.

“We want to ensure that all our students have equitable access to required course materials the very first day they walk into the classroom,” said Candice Jackson, Ph.D., acting vice president for Academic Affairs, Kentucky State University. “If a student does not own a computer, not to worry. Students can choose to rent a computer for a small use fee, or the university will offer free computer at convenient locations all over campus which includes, dorm, computer labs and the library.”

Kentucky State University is recognizes that providing comprehensive support both inside and outside the classroom is a key to student success. To provide student with crucial academic and technical support, KSU has created a technical help desk and Smarthinking online tutoring services part of its partnership with Pearson.

“There are some outstanding things happening at Kentucky State University and this is one of them,” said Thompson. “We are thrilled to be able to offer the free electronic textbooks to our students.”

About Kentucky State University

Kentucky State University, building on its legacy of achievement as a historically black, liberal arts, and 1890 Land Grant University, affords access to and prepares a diverse population of traditional and non-traditional students to compete in a multifaceted, ever-changing global society by providing student-centered learning while integrating teaching, research and service through high-quality undergraduate and select graduate programs. Located in Frantfort, Kentucky, KYSU offers associate  (two-year) degrees in two disciplines, baccalaureate (four-year) degrees in 24 disciplines, master’s degrees in eight disciplines, and one advanced practice doctorate in Nuring. KYSU has 129 full-time instructional faculty members and more than 1,700 students.

For more information about Kentucky State University and in all thing excellence, visit their website at www.kysu.edu or call (502) 597-6000.

Source: http://kysu.edu/2016/08/04/kentucky-state-university-announces-free-e-textbooks-for-students/.

Newly HBCU Freshmen! It’s that time… Welcome to college at a HBCU! The HBCU Campaign Fund organization would like to share a few tips (listed below) with you to makes sure that you are mentally prepared for your first year and for the years to come until you’ve walked across the stage.

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  1. Go to Class! The first class period is very important; missing the first class deprives you of critical information regarding course assignments and expectations.
  2. Set ground rules with your roommate. You’ll never regret knowing exactly where both of you stand.
  3. Be considerate of your roommate. Selfishness has no place at college.
  4. Set a goal for your grade point average (GPA).
  5. Know the names of all your professors and where their offices are located.
  6. Get to know your academic adviser. Be sure to make your first contact during the first weeks of the semester.
  7. Find the quietest place on campus and visit it for three hours, three times a week.
  8. Develop a sense of belonging, get involved, and make friends. Join a student organization.
  9. Know where you can receive academic assistant, i.e., writing labs, computer labs, tutoring.
  10. Get plenty of sleep! Sleep is very important. Staying up until 3:00 a.m. could begin to take its toll with missing morning classes.
  11. Always have a classmate or tutor read over a paper before submitting it.
  12. Be very careful about disobeying University rules. CHEATING and DRUG USE will get you expelled.
  13. Be prepared for some homesickness. It will go away soon.
  14. Keep lines of communication open. Talk with parents, friends and teachers. Use e-mail and text! (Only if you like to text)
  15. File for financial aid FAFSA early (beginning in January and as late as April 15th) – Failure to file could cost you to lost the big bucks that you were suppose to be eligible for to help you pay for your tuition.
  16. Treat other students around campus with respect! You want to be treated the same way.
  17. Fully understand: “You are responsible for your actions.” You will have an incredible amount of freedom – DO NOT abuse it!
  18. This is NOT high school! Be prepared to work hard!

(Partially adapted from the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff and Jackson State University)

Good luck and please stay connected with the HBCU Campaign Fund organization, informing us on how your HBCU experience is going!