FAIRFIELD, Ala. – Miles College has recently announced an increased in total enrollment this fall by 4%, the College’s second consecutive enrollment increase since 2019. Miles College simultaneously welcomed 519 new students this semester, a 7% increase from 2020. The incoming class boasted a 3.07 average GPA, one of the highest among all new classes to date.

The College enrolled 126 transfer students for the fall 2021-2022 academic year, an increased of 50% from the 2020 school year. The phenomenal single-year, double-digit percentage enrollment increase culminated in a final fall 2021 enrollment count of 1,501 students at Greater Birmingham’s only four-year historically black college or university (HBCU). This increase brings total enrollment above 1,500 for the first time since 2017.

Additionally, the College deplayed an aggressive campaign to engage students who had their education disrupted for various reasons. In collaboration with Regions Foundation, this campaign resulted in Miles College re-enrolling 132 students returning to Miles College after disruption of at least a year of non-continuous enrollment. A total increase of 132% from 2020.

“This is a true testament to the work that our enrollment management team is doing to have this type of growth and success for the second year in a row,” said Bobbie Knight, Miles College President. “I am extremely proud of the hard work that we are doing at Miles College to ensure that we continue to recruit, retain, and educate our amazing students.”

Miles College has focused on improving its programs and processes to ensure student success. Despite the challenges brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, Miles College was very aggressive with its recruiting tactics.

“Guided by our strategic planning efforts, we’re leading the way in Alabama and nationally in our efforts to remove barriers to provide a global, high-quality educational experience for all of our students,” said Michael A. Johnson, Vice President for Enrollment Management. “It’s been an incredibly challenging year, but we’re seeing very positive trends in key areas, from our freshman enrollment growth to our community partnerships, much like the articulation agreement signed with Lawson State Community College last spring and we look forward to continuing to leverage these partnerships to enhance opportunities for our students.”

About Miles College
Miles College, founded in 1898, is a primer liberal arts institution located in metropolitan Birmingham within the corporate limits of the City of Fairfield. The noble founders of the institution saw educated leadership as the paramount need in the black community. Miles, which is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and accredited by Commission on Colleges for the awarding of Baccalaureate Degrees, is the only four-year institution in historic Birmingham, Alabama designated as a member of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU). For more information, visit www.miles.edu.

The NBA is continuing its ongoing commitment to HBCUs through three new key efforts.

NEW YORK – The NBA has announced an extension of its ongoing commitment to Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) with new programs designed to create greater opportunity for students and alumni, encourage economic advancement and further celebrate their rich traditions. As part of this partnership, the NBA will develop new programs and events focused on the HBCU community – specifically around professional development, career advancement and increased support and awareness for HBCU athletics and institutions.

The NBA is committed to supporting the growth of the next generation of leaders from the Black community. HBCUs – which produce 20 percent of the country’s Black college graduates but only account for three percent of all colleges in the United States – have historically been under-resourced, averaging one-eighth the size of endowments of historically white colleges and universities. The NBA’s programming will advance educational, career and economic opportunities in collaboration with HBCU networks, and will focus on three areas:

New Fellowship Program for Career Development

  • Launching in 2022, the NBA and its teams will offer a new paid fellowship program for undergraduate and graduate students. The program, which will be led by the NBA Foundation, will offer HBCU students the opportunity to gain real-life insights and professional experience around the business and operations of basketball. The students will work in positions at the league office and NBA and WNBA teams, and be matched with a league or team employee mentor as part of their experience. Applications for the program will open on Careers.NBA.com in the coming months.

NBA HBCU Classic

  • Building off the success of NBA All-Star 2021, the NBA and the National Basketball Players Association (NBPA) will once again highlight the HBCU community during NBA All-Star 2022 in Cleveland
  • The celebrations will be highlighted by a Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) matchup between Howard University and Morgan State University men’s basketball teams. The game will be played at the Wolstein Center in Cleveland on February 19, 2022 and will be broadcast live.
  • During NBA All-Star, more than $1 million will be contributed in support to the HBCU community through the Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF), UNCF (United Negro College Fund) and academic institutions. Additionally, HBCUs will be showcased through unique content, storytelling and special performances.

Additional Programming:

  • The NBA, G League and Basketball Africa League will leverage their pre-Draft combines and showcase events for HBCU players, coaches and athletic trainers. These engagements will increase exposure and opportunities to pursue professional basketball careers.
  • The league will expand the NBA’s targeted referee development strategy to leverage existing programs and focus on identification, training and educational opportunities for HBCU students and alumni in the officiating pipeline.
  • The NBA 2K League will host events with HBCU networks to introduce students to careers in gaming and esports, creating pathways for students to pursue careers in the growing industry.
  • HBCU alumni and Black entrepreneurs will partner with the league as part of the NBA’s commitment to onboarding more minority-owned businesses as league licensees.
  • The NBA will air special alternate game telecasts this season featuring interactive enhancements on League Pass and will work with HBCU schools to provide special experience around those select games.
  • These new efforts will bolster the league’s support of HBCUs and their students through additional scholarship programs, business case competitions, mentorship, networking and internship opportunities with partners, teams, the NBA Foundation and other members of the NBA family. Former NBA Commissioner David Stern served as a founding member of the TMCF Board of Directors for more than 30 years.

To read more, click here.

Washtenaw Community College, Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University and Southern University at New Orleans recently announced a partnership creating a pathway to success for students transferring associate degrees.

Announced ahead of National Transfer Student Week (Oct. 18-22), this news marks the first comprehensive agreement – with benefits such as guaranteed admission and access to in-state tuition – between a Michigan two-year school and a Historically Black College & University (HBCU).

The Washtenaw Community College HBCU Pathway program creates opportunities for student success and transfer equity by providing a clear, direct, affordable and supportive pathway for community college students to attend HBCUs.

In addition to guaranteeing admission to Jackson State (JSU), Mississippi Valle State (MVSU) and Southern University at New Orleans (SUNO) for WCC students who successfully complete requirements, the partnership opens access to in-state tuition and scholarships and waives application fees.

Transfer agreements between WCC and other HBCUs will soon be announced.

Representatives from JSU, MVSU and SUNO will discuss a partnership and transfer information during a panel session hosted by WCC during National Transfer Week. Current and prospective WCC students and families, as well as members of the community, are invited to register to attend the virtual session from 6-7:30 p.m. (EST) on Wednesday, Oct. 20.

WCC President Dr. Rose B. Bellance

“Creating a pipeline for students success is essential to our mission, and it starts with access, nurturing students with big dreams and helping them realize the opportunities to further their education,” said WCC President Dr. Rose B. Bellance.

“Our new HBCU pathway is designed to support students from high school through community college and then through completion of their bachelor’s degree. We are excited to announce our first HBCU partnerships with Jackson State, Mississippi Valley State and Southern University in New Orleans.”

The three HBCUs are rich in history with an extensive offering of undergraduate and graduate programs, including those Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).

Jackson State University President Thomas K. Hudson, J.D.

“Our new partnership with Wastenaw Community College will ensure that deserving students have a solid pathway to continue their education in a caring, encouraging environment that will enhance their skills in their chosen field of interest,” said JSU President Thomas K. Hudson, J.D.

“I look forward to watching these students matriculate to obtain their bachelor’s degrees and beyond.”

Located in Jackson, Miss., Jackson State University was originally founded in 1877 as a seminary and today has grown into a comprehensive urban research university offering a wide range of undergraduate and graduate programs, including at the doctorate level.

MVSU President Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr.

“We here at MVSU are so excited to join in partnership with Washtenaw Community College,” said MVSU President Dr. Jerryl Briggs, Sr. “Having a pathway for students to transfer seamlessly between our institutions shows our mutual commitment to student success and further supports the importance of higher education achievement. We look forward to starting and building on this tremendous opportunity.”

Located in Itta Bena, Miss., Mississippi Valley State University held its first classes in 1950, originally to train rural and elementary teachers and to provide vocational education. It now offers comprehensive undergraduate and graduate programs in education, the arts and sciences, and professional studies.

SUNO Executive Vice President-Chancellor Dr. James H. Ammons, Jr.

“We are excited to partner with Washtenaw Community College and also pleased to be one of the three HBCUs to create opportunities for student success,” said Dr. James H. Ammons, Jr., SUNO Executive Vice President-Chancellor. “This is also a great way for Southern University at New Orleans to expand its footprint in the Michigan region. Students will have an impeccable transfer experience from WCC to SUNO to enroll in our undergraduate degree programs and also matriculate to our graduate programs.”

Located in New Orleans, SUNO was founded as a branch unit of Southern University and Agricultural & Mechanical College in Baton Rouge in 1956 and offers undergraduate and graduate programs in the arts and sciences, business and public administration, education and human development and social work.

One of the benefits of the new HBCU transfer pipeline is that it offers an attractive return on investment for college students and families. With a $2,280 average annual full-time in-district tuition, WCC already provides an affordable start to a college education.

“This is the perfect opportunity for me. Having the close-knit community and support services that both WCC and HBCUs offers for biology majors like myself is very important,” said current WCC student Alexia Easley, an Ypsilanti resident and Ann Arbor Pioneer High School graduate. “I’m excited because I know HBCUs provide such a phenomenal impact on STEM students.”

DeVaughn Swanson knows the value of great opportunities an HBCU education provides. The former WCC student transferred to Morehouse College in Atlanta in 2008. He graduated from Morehouse in 2012 and is now a Detroit attorney and Ypsilanti pastor.

“WCC prepared me for Morehouse College by offering rigorous courses and practical student leadership opportunities. I think this partnership is a dynamic idea and further proves that WCC is committed to ensuring the future success of all WCC students,” Swanson said. “This partnership gives students interested in HBCUs something to look forward to and work toward. A person who has been educated at WCC and an HBCU is destined to make a positive impact on the world.”

WCC’s Office of Diversity and Inclusion led development of the alliance to provide additional pathways to success for the college’s diverse student population and is planning high school outreach events to highlight the new HBCU agreements as well as programming and support for WCC students planning to transfer to an HBCU partner.

For more information, email diversity@wccnet.edu.

###

BATON ROUGE, LA – Southern University and A&M College continues to enjoy significant enrollment growth that now spans over the past five years. For the fall 2021 semester, a preliminary total of 7,404 students are currently enrolled at the flagship campus of the Southern University System. This is an overall increase of seven percent from the fall semester of 2020 and a particularly noteworthy 17 percent increase in the number of the first-time freshmen currently attending the institution. These number include both undergraduate and graduate students.

This steady increase in enrollment is an obvious testament that Southern University continues to stand as a premier institution of higher learning,” said Ray L. Benton, president-chancellor of the Southern University System and chancellor of Southern University and A&M College. “It is also a testament that students look to Southern to create and continue legacies that positively impact their families and communities.”

While Southern continues to have a majority enrollment of Black students, enrollment has also increased from fall 2020 among several other racial and ethnic groups. This includes an 75 percent increase in students of Asian descent, a 25 percent increase in students of Native American or Alaskan Indian descent, and a 15 percent increase in student of Hispanic descent.

Student come from 40 states in the U.S., including Louisiana, with 63 parishes represented. Nearly 30 countries are also represented in this fall class. With the given enrollment growth, Southern is well-positioned for target goal attainment as indicated in the campus strategic plan.

Southern was recently named among the top 20 Historically Black Colleges and Universities in the nation by U.S. News and World Report. The university is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges to award baccalaureate, master’s and doctoral degrees.

About Southern University and A&M College
The mission of Southern University and A&M College, an Historically Black, 1890 land-grant institution, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is to provide a student-focused teaching and learning environment that creates global leadership opportunities for a diverse student population where teaching, research, service, scholarly and creative expectation for students and faculty are achieved through the bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral programs offered at the institution via different instructional modalities and via public service. For more information, visit www.subr.edu.

###

Chicago State University’s entrance sign.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – U.S. Senators Tammy Duckworth (D-IL) and Dick Durbin (D-IL) announced $587,729 in federal funding to Chicago State University. The funding from the U.S. Department of Education’s Predominately Black Institutions Program will assist the university in implementing their Resiliency and Capacity Expansion for Student Success in the Health Professions (RECESS-HP) Program. Chicago State, located on Chicago’s South Side, is Illinois’ only four-year U.S. Department of Education-designated Predominately Black Institution.

“Those of us who weren’t always sure we’d be able to go to college or faced barriers upon entry understand the power of a diploma,” said Duckworth. “I’ll keep working with Senator Durbin to ensure federal support for higher education, especially for Illinois schools like Chicago State University and for working class communities and communities of color, so that every American has the opportunity to enroll in college and complete a degree.”

“Higher education should be accessible to every American, no matter who they are or where they live. Today’s federal funding will help recruit and enroll students at Chicago State University to study health and science at an affordable cost. I will continue to work with Senator Duckworth to secure these kind of investments in communities of color and Predominately Black Institutions,” said Durbin.

“This funding, part of a 5-year, $2.9 million commitment, will help ensure Chicago State University’s continued excellence in the health sciences, where our graduate experience 100 percent job placement. Health sciences in an area of growth in the Illinois workforce, and we know that increasing access into the healthcare workforce for communities of color is key to addressing health inequities, so we will continue our innovative student success strategies with this federal funding,” said Chicago State University President Zaldwaynaka “Z” Scott, Esq.

Through RECESS-HP, Chicago State plans to prioritize outreach to Black men, develop programs in health education and sciences and improve and expand hybrid and remote learning for students at the university. The U.S. Department of Education’s Predominately Black Institutions Program awards grant to eligible colleges to make higher education more accessible for low-and middle income Black students.

###

The Baltimore Ravens will honor former longtime general manager and Hall of Famer Ozzie Newsome by making a $4 million gift in his name to Maryland’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).

The donation from Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and his wife, Renee, will create the Ozzie Newsome Scholars Program, which will fund scholarships for Baltimore City Public Schools graduates who attend an HBCU in Maryland.

“The brilliance of Ozzie Newsome extends far beyond his accolades as a player and executive,” said Bisciotti in a statement. “Throughout his entire life, Ozzie has inspired and uplifted everyone around him with his leadership, humility and determination. We hope that Ozzie’s example will inspire each of the Newsome scholars.”

Each of Maryland’s four HBCUs — Bowie State University, Coppin State University, Morgan State University, and the University of Maryland Eastern Shore — will receive a $1 million gift as part of the program. Yearly, each of the four schools will select five City Schools’ graduates as Ozzie Newsome Scholar recipients for its incoming freshman class.

Ozzie Newsome

“I am humbled and honored that Steve and Renee Bisciotti chose to associate my name with this tremendously important scholarship,” said Newsome in a statement. “This program will give many local graduates the ability to continue their education, and in turn will equip them with the necessary tools to make meaningful impact in the Baltimore community and beyond. Thee students will further their education through Maryland’s Historically Black Colleges and Universities, which is especially meaningful to me. I look forward to watching the progress made through this scholarship program.”

Scholars will receive an annual college scholarship of $10,000 for up to five years of college, for a total investment of up to $50,000 per scholar.

“We embrace the responsibility of discovering ways to strengthen educational opportunities for the youth of Baltimore City,” stated Bisciotti. “Any positive impact that can be made to help students – especially in the pursuit of a college education and their career goals – only strengthens our community as a whole. The Ozzie Newsome Scholars Program has the added benefit of providing scholarships funds for Maryland’s four HBCUs, which have served Maryland and Baltimore City so well for many years.”

###

ST. LOUIS, MO – Dr. Corey Bradford, Sr. has announced that he is leaving Harris-Stowe State University (HSSU) to pursue an opportunity at a research university, the HSSU Board of Regents thanks Dr. Bradford for his leadership. Bradford took over as president in May 2020, replacing Dr. Dwaun Warmack, who left to for an opportunity of president at Claflin University. Bradford’s inauguration ceremony, postponed by the pandemic, was held on April 9, 2021.

Dr. Corey Bradford, Sr.

The university has announced that Dr. LaTonia Collins Smith, currently Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, will serve as Interim President, effective June 1, 2021. Collins Smith has more than 20 years of progressive leadership experience with an extensive background in administration and program development. She began her career in higher education at Harris-Stowe State University in 2010 as a project coordinator in the Office of Counseling Services. She has also served the institution as associate provost, assistant provost and as executive director of Center for Career Engagement.

Dr. Collins Smith is the co-principal investigator of a $5 million National Science Foundation grant to substantially strengthen STEM in the state of Missouri, the largest grant in the history of Harris-Stowe. She currently serves as a peer reviewer for the Higher Learning Commission (HLC), the nation’s largest regional accreditation body. She also served as the campus team lead for the following initiatives; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Re-Imagine First Year Project, the Strada Foundation Measuring College Value project, the Complete College America MSI Initiative, the Ascendium Project Success Initiative and the Gallup Alumni Survey Project.

Dr. LaTonia Collins Smith

Dr. Collins Smith serves as chair of the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Statewide Celebration Commission of Missouri and a member of the Downtown Advisory Board for Greater St. Louis, Inc. She served on both the Alumni Board of Directors and Alumni Foundation Board of the University of Central Missouri. She is a member of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE).

Dr. Collins Smith has received several leadership and service awards including the Equal Education Opportunity Group Pioneer Award, the NAACP Ben Hooks Community Leader award and the AKA Central Region’s Outstanding Educational Advancement Foundation Captain award. She is a 2019 Millennium Leadership Initiative Protégé, a St. Louis Business Diversity Initiative Fellow and a Higher Education Leadership Foundation Fellow.

Collins Smith earned a educational doctorate in higher education leadership from Maryville University in St. Louis. She holds a master of social work degree and a master of public health from Saint Louis University. She is a graduate of the University of Central Missouri, where she majored in social work.

Chair of the Board of Regents Ron Norwood commented that “Dr. Collins Smith has a proven record of outstanding leadership and will serve the University well.”

###

BOWIE, MD – A new endowed cybersecurity chair position will be established at Bowie State University to accelerate the institution’s efforts to support students and graduates equipped generate new innovation in the profession, thanks to $500,000 in matching funds from the Maryland Department of Commerce.

Through the Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative Fund, a state program for STEM research at colleges and universities, Bowie State University will establish an endowed chair of cybersecurity, who will serve as the director of the Center for Cybersecurity and Emerging Technologies in the Department of Computer Science.

“Bowie State University is grateful for the Maryland E-Nnovation award that will help enable us to launch the first endowed chair position in the history of this institution,” said Guy-Alain Amoussou, Associate Provost. “Cybersecurity and Entrepreneurship represent two areas of strength at Bowie State University, and the creation of this endowed chair position will contribute to build a pipeline of cyber entrepreneurs who will contribute to the economic development of the region.”

The initiative will create a Bowie State ecosystem of cyber innovators, infuse entrepreneurship and technology in STEM curriculum, and enhance Bowie State’s pipeline of students from traditionally underrepresented communities to become cybersecurity and entrepreneurship leaders.

“The past year has shown us time and time again why innovative thinking and creative new ideas are essential to Maryland’s economic prosperity. We can never be sure what obstacles life will throw in our path,” said Kelly M. Schulz, Maryland Commerce Secretary. “By supporting these professorships, Commerce is helping make sure that some of the sharpest minds in Maryland continue their important work.”

The Maryland E-Nnovation Initiative was created by the General Assembly during the 2014 legislative session and has provided more than $54.3 million in funding to leverage more than $60.6 million in private donations.

About Bowie State University
Bowie State University (BSU) is an important higher education access portal for qualified persons from diverse academic and socioeconomic backgrounds, seeking a high-quality and affordable public comprehensive university. The university places special emphasis on the science, technology, cybersecurity, teacher education, business, and nursing disciplines within the context of a liberal arts education. For more information about BSU, visit bowiestate.edu.

About Maryland Commerce
The Maryland Department of Commerce stimulates private investment and creates jobs by attracting new businesses, encouraging the expansion and retention of existing companies, and providing financial assistance to Maryland companies. The Department promotes the State’s many economic advantages and markets local products and services at home and abroad to spur economic development and international investment, trade and tourism. Because they are major economic generators, the Department also supports the Arts, film production, sports and other special events. For more information, visit commerce.maryland.gov.

###

HOUSTON, TX – The Texas Southern University (TSU) Board of Regents named Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young as the sole finalist for the position of President of Texas Southern University.

Dr. Lesia L. Crumpton-Young

A confirmation vote by the Regents will occur at the next board meeting on June 17, 2021. The transition team will be lead by Regent Stephanie Nellons-Paige and Interim President Kenneth Huewitt.

“Dr. Crumpton-Young is an experienced University leader and tireless advocate for students. Her impeccable credentials made her standout among the candidates. She brings with her an exciting and bold vision for Texas Southern University that aligns with the goals set forth by the Board of Regents,” said Albert H. Myres, Sr., TSU Board of Regents Chairman.

Myres thanked the Presidential Search Committee, chaired by Regent Marc Carter, who narrowed the list of candidates for president to three finalists who were invited to Houston for interviews. Crumpton-Young will replace TSU Interim President Kenneth Huewitt, who has served in the role since April 2020.

I’m honored to be considered by the full Texas Southern University Board of Regents as the sole finalist for the next president,” said Crumpton-Young. “TSU is a vibrant and treasured institution filled with legacy, excellence and promise. It will be an honor and privilege to serve.”

Crumpton-Young has served as Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs and Chief Academic Officer at Morgan State University since 2019. Previously, she served at Tennessee State University in several roles including, Vice President for Research and Institutional Advancement and Chief Research Officer and Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs for Research and Sponsored Programs and Chief Research Officer. Prior to her role at Tennessee State University, she served an Associate Provost of Undergraduate Studies at Texas A&M University, Program Director in the Education and Human Resource Directorate of the National Science Foundation and Associate Dean of Engineering at Mississippi State University.

In those roles, she initiated new hiring strategies to diversify University faculty and garnered seven-figure monetary gifts to fund student scholarships, research, and support Diversity Equity and Inclusion as well as student and faulty success. She received her Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering, Master of Science in Industrial Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering from Texas A&M University. In addition, Crumpton-Young holds a Master of Business Administration from Tennessee State University.

About Texas Southern University
Texas Southern University is a student-centered comprehensive doctoral university committed to ensuring equality, offering innovative programs that are responsive to its urban setting, and transforming diverse students into lifelong learners, engaged citizens, and creative leaders in their local, national, and global communities. For more information, visit www.tsu.edu.

PINE BLUFF, AR – The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) has announced today that Chris Robinson, Interim Director of Athletics, has been appointed as Athletics Director effective immediately. Robinson has served as Interim Director of the Athletics Department since Chris Peterson retired in February.

Chirs Robinson, Director of Athletics.

Since moving to the Athletics Department at UAPB, AD Robinson has had success working to improve all facets of the operation for the benefits of the student athletes. In addition to earning the very strong endorsement of the AD Search Committee, he also enjoys the widespread enthusiastic support of the staff, the alumni and key stakeholders.

Prior to serving as Interim Athletics Director, Robinson served as Executive Associate Athletics Directors. Prior to moving to athletics department administration in January 2020, Robinson served for 8 years as director of the Office of Recruitment.

When he rejoined the UAPB Athletics Department, he returned to the place where he enjoyed success as a football player and coach for the Golden Lions. After playing for the legendary Archie “The Gunslinger” Cooley, he transferred to Southern University, playing quarterback for one season. As the UAPB football program returned to play in 1993, he returned to lead the Golden Lions to the 1994 NAIA National Championship Game, highlighted by a seven-touchdown (six passing / one rushing) performance in a come-from-behind overtime semifinal win.

Before returning to UAPB as an assistant coach, he coached quarterbacks and running backs at Mid-American Nazarene University. While also serving as assistant softball coach, and as the school’s Director of Minority Affairs.

A 2014 UAPB Sports Hall of Fame inductee, he earned his bachelor’s degree in management from UAPB, and a master’s degree in business administration from Mid-America Nazarene University.

“On behalf of UAPB, we appreciate the continued support of our students, employees, alumni, and friends as we strive to reach our ultimate goal of achieving success in both athletics and scholarships,” said Dr. Laurence B. Alexander, UAPB Chancellor. “Please join me in congratulating Robinson on his appointment as Director of Athletics. Go Lions!”

About the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB)
The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB) is an 1890 Land-Grant HBCU with a diverse student population, competitive degree offerings, and stellar faculty. For more than 140 years, UAPB has worked to create an environment that emphasizes learning, growth, and productivity while affording a basic need to its students: a chance to advance. UAPB offers certificate and associate degree programs, more than 40 undergraduate and master’s degree programs, and a doctoral program in Aquaculture/Fisheries. Students are active in more than 100 organizations, including an internationally renowned Vesper Choir, Marching Musical Machine of the Mid-South Band, concert bands, wind symphony, and an accomplished athletics program. For more information, visit www.uapb.edu.

###