ORANGEBURG, SC – SC State University will hold its Spring Commencement Ceremony on Friday, May 10, at 6 p.m. at the Oliver C. Dawson Stadium. New Jersey senator and 2020 presidential candidate, Cory Booker, will deliver the commencement speech to the 2019 graduating class.

A native of Washington, D.C, Booker has dedicated his life to fighting for those who have been left out, left behind or left without a voice. In 1996, he moved to Newark, New Jersey, and founded a nonprofit organization to provide legal services for low-income families, helping tenants take on slumlords, improve their living conditions and stay in their homes.

At age 29, Booker was elected to the Newark City Council, and beginning in 2006, he served as Newark’s mayor for more than seven years. He said he is running for president to reignite a spirit of common purpose to build a fairer and just nation for everyone.

Booker was the first African American elected to the U.S. Senate from New Jersey. In the Senate, he has been a vocal critic of the Trump Administration and has underlined the importance of unity and fundamental American values. He has also championed policies that advance economic and equal justice — including leading efforts to reform the broken criminal justice system, increase wages, ensure hard work is fairly rewarded and protect the rights of all Americans to breathe clean air and drink clean water.

Booker held form at SC State last October on the importance of voting in the primary election of November 2018. During the forum, he emphasized the powerful and vital impact today’s youth can have on society when they use their voices for change.

“I am honored to have the opportunity to address the graduating class at South Carolina State University’s Commencement Ceremony. With so many challenges to take on, I believe that this generation will help to chart this nation’s course for decades to come. By coming together in this moment, we can ignite a sense of common purpose that I believe is vital in moving our country forward,” said Booker.

About South Carolina State University

South Carolina State University (SC State) is a historically Black public 1890 land-grant senior comprehensive institution. Located in Orangeburg, South Carolina, SC State University is committed to providing affordable and accessible quality baccalaureate programs in the areas of business, applied professional sciences, mathematics, natural sciences, engineering, engineering technology, education, arts, and humanities. A number of programs are offered at the master’s level in teaching, human services and agribusiness, and the educational specialist and doctorate programs are offered in educational administration. For more information, visit www.scsu.edu

###

Providing research on the role of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) in its today’s role in higher education and various research methods addressing student retention rates, success levels, and engagement.

IGI Global announced the release of “Examining Student Retention and Engagement Strategies at Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” edited by Samuel L. Hinton, Ed. D., an independent researcher and South Carolina State University graduate, and Antwon D. Woods, Ph. D., Department Chairman & Assistant Professor of Sports Management at Belhaven University and Jackson State University graduate.

While highlighting topics such as enrollment management, student engagement, and online learning, this publication explores successful engagement strategies that promote education quality and equality as well as the methods of social integration and involvement for students, according to an article by The Times & Democrat.

This book is designed for researchers, academicians, scholars, educational administrators, policy makers, graduate students, and curriculum designers.

The book is available on the IGI Global Bookstore or Amazon.

ORANGEBURG, SC – After serving 22 years in the U.S. Army and overcoming various obstacles, James Robinson, earned his Bachelor’s of Science in family and consumer sciences from South Carolina State University on May 11 at 82-years-old, according to the university.

Born and raised in Coward, South Carolina, Robinson love for education sparked when he was a young boy growing up in Florence County. Born into an era plagued by a severe economic downturn and racial division, he had always deemed education a necessity.

After earning an associate degree in history from the University of South Carolina, Robinson chose to attend SC State because he believed it would provide him the close-knit and tailored learning experience he was seeking.

“I went to a small, rural school where I’m not sure if education meant a lot to some people, but it meant a lot to me. I knew I had to get an education so that life could be more abundant,” Robinson said.

After graduating from high school, he chose to attend Allen University in Columbia. Faced with the costs of attending college, he decided to join the U.S. Army instead and travel the world. Despite joining the military, Robinson always had his mind set on receiving an education and eventually, a four-year degree.

He completed military assignments in South Carolina, Georgia, Massachusetts and overseas in Korea, France and Germany. As he traveled, he was exposed to different cultural experiences and learned how to navigate the changing world.

While fulfilling an assignment in Germany, he learned that one of his daughters was suffering from heart complications, and returned home. As she recovered, he completed assignments at For Jackson and later returned to Europe.

He eventually arrived at Fort Benning, Georgia, where he retired in 1980 as a Master Sgt. While serving in the Army, he completed classes and earned various certificates, which allowed him to substitute teach in Columbia’s public schools after retiring from the military.

The Columbia resident has enjoyed teaching and offering his wisdom to numerous students he encountered throughout the years. He believes he has learned a lot from students and hopes to continue to inspire the youth.

“Some people might see the generation gap as a challenge, but to me, it provides a learning experience. There are lessons we [younger and older generations] can learn from each other. I think patience is something that I learned more of, and I believe my classmates learned that too,” Robinson said.

With unwavering faith in God, he also served as a pastor at Walkers Chapel in Hemingway, South Carolina and Mount Moriah Baptist Church in Johnsonville, South Carolina.

Balancing school, work and taking care of his family presented challenges for Robinson, but he was determined to earn his bachelor’s degree, not only for himself but for his family as well. After his wife was diagnosed with brain damage, resulting in dementia, Robinson became even more determined to finish college.

“I know how good my wife has been to me. I have to do all I can for her. I didn’t care if it took me 100 years to get this degree. I was going to get it done,” he said.

He hopes to use his family and consumer sciences degree to continue the work that has fulfilled him throughout his life, which is helping the youth and others within his community. He is grateful to SC State for providing him the opportunity to achieve a lifetime goal and is honored to graduate from the historically black college.

Robinson and his wife, Ethel, have three children, Patricia, Carolyn and James.

Dr. Judith Salley-Guydon

ORANGEBURG, SC – South Carolina State University, a historically black university, was recently awarded a grant in the amount of $6.2 million by the National Cancer Institute, to establish the South Carolina Disparities Research Center.

According to www.thetandd.com, a portion of the total $12.5 million award will fund the Medical University of South Carolina’s cancer disparities research. The two university will collaborate on this project.

S.C. State will partner with the Regional Medical Center and its Mabry Cancer Center to create a biorepository at the new research center on the campus of S.C. State. This biorepository will be the first to store solely African American biological tissue for cancer studies. The partnership will also establish the first clinical trials office at the Regional Medical Center for patients with prostate cancer.

The goal of the research center is to improve S.C. State’s ability to complete effective cancer research and to focus on examining cancer disparities within the areas of prostate and breast cancer. The grant will also allocate funds to create an honors research curriculum, which will allow students to obtain certification in health disparities research. The center will provide an opportunity for the new generation of researchers to train, inform the general public and contribute knowledge to a research field that affects the lives of many.

Serving a S.C. State’s principal investigator for this project is Dr. Judith Salley-Guydon, the chairwoman of the university’s Department of Biological and Physical Sciences. She believes that this grant will take S.C. State’s cancer research to new heights.

“These funds will enable us to explore in depth the cancer disparities that surround our communities and beyond. With a new, cutting-edge facility, we hope to yield results that ultimately improve the health disparities that many individuals endure,” Salley-Guydon said.

“I’d like to point out that African American men in Orangeburg and across the nation suffer disproportionately from prostate cancer. We’re hoping that this research has a positive impact on their quality of life as well. With such a talented and passionate team collaborating on this project, I know that we will accomplish these goals and much more,” she continued.

Dr. Marvella Ford, a public health sciences professor and researcher at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Hollings Cancer Center, serves as the principal investigator for MUSC’s cancer disparities research. Additionally, she was recently named SmartState endowed chair for prostate cancer research at S.C. State University.

This grant is the first of its kind in the state of South Carolina. With the establishment of the South Carolina Disparities Research Center, global research scientists will be able to obtain samples from S.C. State’s biorepository.

Additionally, other S.C. State faculty will direct research activities for this project. The faculty members and their departments are as follows:

Department of Biological and Physical Sciences

• Dr. Ashley Knowell

• Dr. Shanora Brown

• Dr. Mahtubbuddin Ahmed

• Dr. James Stukes

• Dr. Saku Warshamana-Greene

• Dr. Diondra Randle

• Brandi Wright

Program Managers

• Deborah McAllister

• April Wright

Other departments

• Dr. McCrary-Quarles, Health and Physical Education

• Dr. William Whittaker, Family and Consumer Science

• Dr. Tahsoh, Mathematics and Computer Science

• Elbert Malone, Office of the Provost

• Deborah Blacknall; Laverne Proctor Streeter; Gwendolyn Ulmer, Office of Sponsored Programs

 

For more information, please contact Dr. Judith Salley-Guydon at 803-536-8509.

 

 

 

Source: http://thetandd.com/news/s-c-state-university-awarded-million-for-cancer-research/article_e6c6db8f-7676-56d1-bdb2-08dbce9c1c76.html#tracking-source=home-top-story-1?platform=hootsuite.

ORANGEBURG, SC – South Carolina State University (SCSU) commemorated the 50th Anniversary of the Orangeburg Massacre on Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, at 11 a.m. in the Smith-Hammond-Middleton Memorial Center (SHM). The University will pause to remember those martyrs whose lives were taken that February night in 1968, and those that were wounded during the most significant civil rights event in the history of the state of South Carolina.

The theme for the event is 50 Years Later: Remembering History, Inspiring Hope and Embracing Healing.

Each year since 1968, the University has held an observance to commemorate the lives of 18-year-old SC State students Henry Smith and Samuel Hammond Jr., 17-year-old high school student Delano Middleton. This often neglected and overlooked tragedy is not nearly as well known as the shootings at Kent State and Jackson State in 1970, although it had a profound effect on the Orangeburg community and surrounding area.

On Feb. 8, 1968, after three nights of escalating racial tension over efforts by students of then-SC State College and others to desegregate the local All-Star Bowling Lanes, three students were killed and at least 28 other were injured when S.C. Highway Patrolmen opened fire on a crowd of unarmed protesters at the front of campus.

This year’s venue for the commemorative anniversary will be held at the SHM Memorial Center, the physical education facility constructed in 1968 in honor of Smith, Hammond, and Middleton. There will be a program and candle lighting ceremony at SHM, followed by a reception and book signing in the IP Stanback Museum and Planetarium. The event is free and open to the public.

“The Orangeburg Massacre is an important part of the University’s history, as well as that of the region and state. We look forward to the community joining us to commemorate the 50th Anniversary as we remember those who gave their lives in name of civil liberties,” said James E. Clark, president of SC State.

Bakari Sellers served as the keynote speaker. He is the son of Cleveland Sellers who was one of those wounded in the Orangeburg Massacre and the only person convicted of any crime in connection with the Orangeburg protests. Bakari Sellers was born in 1984 and raised in Denmark, South Carolina. Sellers attended SC State’s Felton Laboratory School, graduated from the South Carolina public school system, and then enrolled at Morehouse College. While at Morehouse, he was elected Student Government Association President and served on the College’s Board of Trustees. He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in 2005.

After graduating from Morehouse College, Bakari Sellers attended the University of South Carolina School of Law where he graduated in 2008. He was worked for United State Congressman James Clyburn and former Atlanta Mayor Shirley Franklin. He was one of the youngest State Representatives and the youngest black elected official in the United States at the time.

Sellers has had extensive leadership experience working for the Democratic Leadership Council, and Obama for America campaign. He is a former member of the South Carolina House of Representatives. He was elected to the House at the age of 23 in 2006 and represented the 90th District until 2014. He was a member of the South Carolina Legislative Black Caucus during his time in the general assembly. He was a candidate for Lt. Governor of South Carolina in 2014. Sellers has been an attorney with the Strom Law Firm, L.L.C. in Columbia, SC since 2007. He also serves as a CNN Political Analyst.

Sellers is the son of Dr. and Mrs. Cleveland Sellers. He is married to Ellen Rucker Carter and they have a daughter, Kai Michelle Carter.

ORANGEBURG, SC – Fifty years ago, on February 8, 1968, the Orangeburg Massacre events happened in Orangeburg, South Carolina at South Carolina State University.  HBCU Campaign Fund organization and the Office of the President and CEO, Founder Demetrius Johnson Jr., stand in commemorates with the Orangeburg community in recognizing the martyrs whose lives were taken 50 years ago on that February night in 1968, which is such a significant event in the African-American and HBCU history.

4f33662c2a5be.image
Pictured: Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond Jr., and Delano Middleton, the three men who were killed in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre which took place on the campus of South Carolina State University (a historically black college and university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina).

 

In the fall of 1967, some of the black leaders within the community tried to convince Harry K. Floyd, the owner of the bowling alley to allow African-Americans. Floyd was unwilling to desegregate which resulted in protests in early February 1968.

On February 6, 1968, a group of students (approximately 200) from South Carolina State University entered into the bowling alley and left peacefully after they were asked to leave by Floyd. The next night more students led by John Stroman returned and entered the bowling alley. This time, there were police waiting for them and several students were arrested including Stroman. After the arrests, more students began showing up angry, breaking a window of the bowling alley and chaos ensured. Police began beating student protesters with billy clubs. That night, eight students were sent to the hospital.

On the night of February 8, 1968, students started a bonfire in the front of South Carolina State University’s campus. As law enforcement attempted to put out the fire, Officer David Shealy was injured by a thrown object. Shortly after (around 10:30 p.m.) South Carolina Highway Patrol officers began firing into the crowd of around 150 protesters. Eight Patrol Officers fired carbines, short guns, and revolvers at the protesters, which lasted around 10 to 15 seconds in an attempt to calm the crowd. South Carolina State students Samuel E. Hammond Jr., Henry E. Smith and high school student Delano Middleton (who attended the local Wilkinson High School) were killed, along with twenty-eight people who were injured in the shooting.

OrangburgMaasacre

In the aftermath of this event, the federal government brought charged against the State patrolmen in the first federal trial of police officers for using excessive force at a campus protest. All nine defendants were acquitted although thirty-six witnesses stated that they did not hear gunfire coming from the protesters on campus before the shooting and no students were found to be carrying guns.

In a state trail in 1970, the activist Cleveland Sellers was convicted of a charged of riot related to the events on February 6 at the bowling alley. He was the national program director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

South Carolina State University’s gymnasium is named in the memorandum of Samuel Hammond, Delano Middleton, and Henry Smith (S-H-M Memorial Center), the three men who were killed. A monument was erected on campus in their honor, and the site has been marked.

Each year since 1968, the University has held an observance to commemorate the lives of 18-year-old SC State students Henry Smith and Samuel Hammond Jr., 17-year-old high school student Delano Middleton. This often neglected and overlooked tragedy is not nearly as well known as the shootings at Kent State and Jackson State in 1970, although it had a profound effect on the Orangeburg community and surrounding area.

hrdCHICAGO, IL – This past June, HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) held its 3rd annual HBCU Royalty Dictionary competition with the theme “Rulers of the Throne”. The competition highlights newly historically black colleges and universities campus Queens, Kings and SGA Presidents.

The HBCU Royalty Dictionary is an initiative that spotlights the newly elected and crowned campus leaders through a pre-submitted biography with a series of questions relating to their campus improvement, strengths, motivation and upcoming plans during their reign or term.

This year’s competition featured a mixture of 20 campus leaders who holds the title of Queen, King and SGA Presidents that were voted by the public to be featured in the dictionary. The leaders are represented from the following schools: Florida Memorial University, Huston-Tillotson University, Stillman College, North Carolina Central University, South Carolina State University, Saint Augustine’s University, Grambling State University, Virginia Union University, Savannah State University, Bennett College,  Benedict College, Fisk University, Claflin University,  University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, Morris College, Savannah State University, Philander Smith College and Chicago State University.

After two (2) years of the competition, this year was the first publication of the HBCU Royalty Dictionary as a magazine. The HBCU Royalty Dictionary is usually published to the HCF’s website featuring the present year induction class.

The 2016 HBCU Royalty Dictionary is now available and can be viewed in PDF format on HCF’s website here. You can purchase the magazine copy for $7.99 + shipping in support of the featured student leaders here.

All proceeds from the magazine will benefit and assist supporting the next HBCU Royalty Dictionary competition, student scholarships, services at HBCU’s and operations of HBCU Campaign Fund.

For more information regarding the HBCU Royalty Dictionary, contact support@hbcucampaignfund.org or call HCF office at 773.988.2106.

ORANGEBURG, SC – On February 8, 1968, the Orangeburg Massacre took place in Orangeburg, South Carolina at South Carolina State University.

4f33662c2a5be.image
Pictured: Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond Jr., and Delano Middleton, the three men who were killed in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre which took place on the campus of South Carolina State University (a historically black college and university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina).

In the fall of 1967, some of the black leaders within the community tried to convince Harry K. Floyd, the owner of the bowling alley to allow African-Americans. Floyd was unwilling to desegregate which resulted in protests in early February 1968.

On February 6, 1968, a group of students (approximately 200) from South Carolina State University entered into the bowling alley and left peacefully after they were asked to leave by Floyd. The next night more students led by John Stroman returned and entered the bowling alley. This time, there were police waiting for them and several students were arrested including Stroman. After the arrests, more students began showing up angry, breaking a window of the bowling alley and chaos ensured. Police began beating student protesters with billy clubs. That night, eight students were sent to the hospital.

On the night of February 8, 1968, students started a bonfire in the front of South Carolina State University’s campus. As law enforcement attempted to put out the fire, Officer David Shealy was injured by a thrown object. Shortly after (around 10:30 p.m.) South Carolina Highway Patrol officers began firing into the crowd of around 150 protesters. Eight Patrol Officers fired carbines, short guns, and revolvers at the protesters, which lasted around 10 to 15 seconds in an attempt to calm the crowd. South Carolina State students Samuel E. Hammond Jr., Henry E. Smith and high school student Delano Middleton (who attended the local Wilkinson High School) were killed, along with twenty-eight people who were injured in the shooting.

OrangburgMaasacre

 

In the aftermath of this event, the federal government brought charged against the State patrolmen in the first federal trial of police officers for using excessive force at a campus protest. All nine defendants were acquitted although thirty-six witnesses stated that they did not hear gunfire coming from the protesters on campus before the shooting and no students were found to be carrying guns.

In a state trail in 1970, the activist Cleveland Sellers was convicted of a charged of riot related to the events on February 6 at the bowling alley. He was the national program director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

South Carolina State University’s gymnasium is named in the memorandum of Samuel Hammond, Delano Middleton, and Henry Smith (S-H-M Memorial Center), the three men who were killed. A monument was erected on campus in their honor, and the site has been marked.

ORANGEBURG, SC – On February 8, 1968, the Orangeburg Massacre took place in Orangeburg, South Carolina at South Carolina State University.

4f33662c2a5be.image
Pictured: Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond Jr., and Delano Middleton, the three men who were killed in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre which took place on the campus of South Carolina State University (a historically black college and university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina).

In the fall of 1967, some of the black leaders within the community tried to convince Harry K. Floyd, the owner of the bowling alley to allow African-Americans. Floyd was unwilling to desegregate which resulted in protests in early February 1968.

On February 6, 1968, a group of students (approximately 200) from South Carolina State University entered into the bowling alley and left peacefully after they were asked to leave by Floyd. The next night more students led by John Stroman returned and entered the bowling alley. This time, there were police waiting for them and several students were arrested including Stroman. After the arrests, more students began showing up angry, breaking a window of the bowling alley and chaos ensured. Police began beating student protesters with billy clubs. That night, eight students were sent to the hospital.

On the night of February 8, 1968, students started a bonfire in the front of South Carolina State University’s campus. As law enforcement attempted to put out the fire, Officer David Shealy was injured by a thrown object. Shortly after (around 10:30 p.m.) South Carolina Highway Patrol officers began firing into the crowd of around 150 protesters. Eight Patrol Officers fired carbines, short guns, and revolvers at the protesters, which lasted around 10 to 15 seconds in an attempt to calm the crowd. South Carolina State students Samuel E. Hammond Jr., Henry E. Smith and high school student Delano Middleton (who attended the local Wilkinson High School) were killed, along with twenty-eight people who were injured in the shooting.

OrangburgMaasacre

 

In the aftermath of this event, the federal government brought charged against the State patrolmen in the first federal trial of police officers for using excessive force at a campus protest. All nine defendants were acquitted although thirty-six witnesses stated that they did not hear gunfire coming from the protesters on campus before the shooting and no students were found to be carrying guns.

In a state trail in 1970, the activist Cleveland Sellers was convicted of a charged of riot related to the events on February 6 at the bowling alley. He was the national program director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

South Carolina State University’s gymnasium is named in the memorandum of Samuel Hammond, Delano Middleton, and Henry Smith (S-H-M Memorial Center), the three men who were killed. A monument was erected on campus in their honor, and the site has been marked.