Assistant Professor Siobahn Grady

North Carolina Central University School of Library and Information Sciences Assistant Professor, Siobhan Day Grady, Ph.D., has received a $190,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help improve the function of self-driving cars.

Assistant Professor Grady said she will use the grant, provided through the Historically Black Colleges and Excellence in Research program at the NSF, to analyze and identify problems encountered by self-driving vehicles. The data will become part of a $1 million NSF project to analyze problems encountered by self-driving vehicles, with the aim of detecting and reducing such incidents in real time.

“This research is very timely and relevant; it’s the future,” said Grady. “I’m excited to contribute to the field as well as provide research opportunities to students.”

Lead investigator on the overall project is Daniel Limbrick, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University, where Grady become the first woman to graduate with a doctoral degree in computer science in 2018.

The researchers will analyze the fault-detection capabilities of autonomous vehicles and look for ways of improving reliability. Three types of faults will be examined: transient, which occur due to external factors, such as the environment; intermittent, where problems are known to occur on an occasional but regular basis; and permanent, which occur regularly because of a physical malfunction and must be corrected to achieve reliability.

The project will result in enhanced course options for students at both institutions, as well as outreach and engagement opportunities, Grady said.

“Dr. Grady is a pioneer in artificial intelligence and machine learning,” said Jon Grant, Ph.D., of the School of Library and information science. “Students in the SLIS graduate program in information science will gain high-demand skills by working with Dr. Grady to develop the next generation of vehicles that will be more intelligent and make transportation in our society safer,” Grant said.

Grady joined the faculty of NCCU in 2019 as assistant professor of information systems. She earned her master’s degree in information science at NCCU in 2009. She also holds a master’s in computer science from NCAT, where she was a Chancellor Distinguished Fellow.

In September 2019, Grant was honored by the If/Then Initiative and the American Association for the Advancement of Science as one of 120 national STEM ambassadors. Life-sized 3D statues of the female scientists will be unveiled this summer at NorthPark in Dallas as part of a $25 million initiative Lynda Hill Philanthropies to highlight female scientists and encourage more girls to enter the STEM fields.

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About North Carolina Central University


North Carolina Central University, with a strong tradition of teaching, research, and service, prepares students to become global leaders and practitioners who transform communities. Through a nationally recognized law school, highly acclaimed and innovative programs in the visual and performing arts, sciences, business, humanities, and education programs, NCCU students are engaged problem solvers. Located in the Research Triangle, the University advances research in the biotechnological, biomedical, informational, computational, behavioral, social, and health sciences. Our students enhance the quality of life of citizens and the economic development of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. For more information, visit www.nccu.edu.

About the National Science Foundation


The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…” NSF is vital because it supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future. For more information, visit www.nsf.gov.

NEW ORLEANS, LA – A $1.2 million federal grant has been awarded to Southern University at New Orleans in an effort to address the shortage of science, technology, engineering and mathematics teachers in what SUNO described as “high-need schools.”

In a press release from the university, The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded SUNO a five-year $1.2 million Robert Noyce grant for a project. SUNO will collaborate with John Ehret High School and Brookhaven National Lab to recruit, support and certify 22 STEM teachers. Recruitment activities will focus on the pool of qualified SUNO undergraduate STEM students enrolled in the Department of Natural Sciences. The project will span from May 2018 through April 2023.

The program activities are excepted to include the following:

1. Early exposure of prospective teachers to high-need schools
2. Seminar series on Characteristics of Highly Effective STEM Teachers
3. Science fair for high school students to attract students to STEM fields and their teachers to teacher certification programs
4. Praxis I & II preparation
5. Post-certification mentoring of new STEM teachers by content faculty mentors.

The project leadership consists of Principal Investigator Dr. Cynthia Singleton (Mathematics), and Co-PIs Dr. Joe Omojola (Mathematics and Physics), Dr. Murty Kambhampati (Biology) and Dr. Louise Kaltenbaugh (Education).

“These experienced faculty members have collaborated successfully on many projects at departmental, college and university levels, including grant writing, committee assignments, and curriculum developments,” said SUNO Chancellor Lisa Mims-Devezin. “They are very passionate about STEM education. I congratulate them for their hard work, commitment and dedication to developing future STEM teachers.”

According to nola.com, SUNO’s project comes amid a statewide push to recruit more teachers. According to teaching certification date provided by the Orleans Parish School Board from the Louisiana State Association of School Personnel Administrator, fewer teaching certification has been issued in Louisiana during a four-year period from the 2012-13 to the 2016-17 school year.

For more information about the Robert Noyce grant project, visit www.suno.edu.