BALTIMORE, MD – With a 580-acre headquarters campus in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and more than 3,000 employees in six locations across the U.S., the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) carries out a mission that helps make possible much of the world’s advancement in science and technology. Last fall, Morgan State University (MSU) began a major collaboration with the institute through a $30-million, five-year program led by The John Hopkins University. The Professional Research Experience Program (PREP) offers undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and faculty from Morgan, Hopkins and Binghamton University, State University of New York opportunities to work at NSIT. Morgan can receive up to $1 million per year from PREP in personnel funds for Morgan students and/or faculty to work to NIST laboratories. Michael Spencer, professor of electrical engineering (ECE).

Founded in 1901 as the National Bureau of Standards, an agency with the mandate to provide standard weights and measures for the nation, NIST took its current name in 1988 and now has a broader mission: “to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.”

Dr. Michael Spencer, Ph.D., professor of electrical engineering (ECE)

“Morgan is geographically fortunate to be situated near several high-quality national laboratories. NIST is one of them, and they have outstanding world-class resources,” says Michael Spencer, Ph.D., professor in Morgan’s Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. School of Engineering and the administrator of Morgan’s PREP grant. “So this becomes an opportunity for students and faculty to develop joint relationships with laboratories of interest at NIST. It’s even more fortuitous that our current Vice President for Research and Development (Willie May, Ph.D.) is a former director of NIST and has a lot of ties there, so he can suggest relationships that can be developed.”

To strengthen the connection between MSU and NIST and to facilitate the University’s participation in the research, Morgan has allocated funds to provide bus transportation to NIST headquarters from the Hopkins campus.

“The program is open to any students or faculty who meet the requirements of the NIST laboratories,” Dr. Spencer says. “NIST’s research is predominately in physical science, computational science and engineering, but they also do work in other areas.

“International, as well as domestic students and faculty, are eligible for PREP,” he adds. “This is one of the few places where an international student can have an internship without having to pass security clearances.”

Dr. Spencer is hopeful that Morgan’s partnership with NIST will flourish to its fullest, noting that one of NIST’s five Nobel laureates will give a lecture at Morgan on April 30.

“If strong collaborations can be established between the laboratories and Morgan through PREP,” he says, “a large number of our students may benefit.

About Morgan State University

Morgan State University serves the community, region, state, nation, and world as an intellectual and creative resource by supporting, empowering and preparing high-quality, diverse graduates to lead the world. The University offers innovative, inclusive, and distinctive educational experiences to a broad cross section of the population in a comprehensive range of disciplines at the baccalaureate, master’s, doctoral, and professional degree levels. Through collaborative pursuits, scholarly research, creative endeavors, and dedicated public service, the University gives significant priority to addressing societal problems, particularly those prevalent in urban communities. For more information, visit www.morgan.edu.

About NIST

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) was founded in 1901 and is now part of the U.S. Department of Commerce. NIST is one of the nation’s oldest physical science laboratories. Congress established the agency to remove a major challenge to U.S. industrial competitiveness at the time—a second-rate measurement infrastructure that lagged behind the capabilities of the United Kingdom, Germany, and other economic rivals. For more information, visit www.nist.gov.

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BALTIMORE, MD – Morgan State University President David Wilson announced on Monday that philanthropist, community activist and renowned national radio host Tom Joyner will deliver the keynote address during the University’s 142nd Commencement. The exercises will take place on Saturday, May 19, 2018, beginning at 9:30 a.m., at Hughes Stadium on campus. In addition to addressing nearly 1,000 degree candidates, Joyner will join two other distinguished citizens in receiving an honorary degree: veteran filmmaker and former Morgan professor Stanley Nelson, and Gloria Ladson-Billings, Ph.D., a university professor emerita, and president of the National Academy of Education.

According to a press release by the university, Known to millions nationwide as “The Fly Jock,” Tom Joyner began his broadcast career in 1970 immediately after his graduation from Tuskegee Institute, an HBCU, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology. Joyner, a native of Tuskegee, Ala., worked his way up through radio in Alabama, Tennessee, Missouri and Texas before eventually parlaying his distinct humor and energy in urban radio to land a high-profile radio position in Chicago.

“We are very excited to have Tom Joyner, one of the biggest supporters of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and their mission, join us on such an auspicious and joyful occasion,” said Dr. Wilson. “Morgan has enjoyed a longtime relationship with Mr. Joyner by way of our involvement with the Tom Joyner Foundation. Having him come to our campus as the Spring Commencement speaker adds yet another layer to that ongoing relationship.”

In 1994, entertainment powerhouse ABC Radio Networks convinced Joyner to take his captivating style of radio nationwide, thus successfully launching “The Tom Joyner Morning Show” into national syndication. Over the years, Joyner has taken his radio program to unexpected heights, using his influence to inspire and activate listeners daily while catering specifically to African-American audiences. Well-known for his dedicated philanthropy and community activism, Joyner has led successful national awareness campaign on voter registration law, family/health initiatives and equitable treatment of minorities. Never one to forget his roots, he created The Tom Joyner Foundation to help retain students in HBCUs. Since its inception, the Foundation has raised more than $60 million.

Joyner has received numerous accolades and awards during his distinguished career, among them a Radio Hall of Fame award, an NAACP Image Award, Impact Magazine’s “Joe Loris Award” for Excellence in Broadcasting and Billboard’s Best Urban Contemporary Air Personality award. Other honors include the BET Humanitarian Award, the Denny’s Community Impact Award, the Septima P. Clark Excellence in Black Education Award and Impact Magazine’s “Best DJ of the Year Award,” which was renamed “The Tom Joyner Award” because he had received it so many times.

Stanley Nelson has been acknowledged as one of the preeminent documentary filmmakers of our time. He has directed and produced more than 12 documentary features, including: “Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution”; Freedom Summer, Freedom Riders”; “Joestown: The Life and Death of People’s Temple”; and “The Murder of Emmett Till.” Nelson’s latest film, “Tell Them We Are Rising: The Story of Black Colleges and Universities,” which features Morgan and an interview with President Wilson, premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival to critical acclaim. Nelson has won many major awards in broadcasting, including a Lifetime Peabody Award, a Lifetime Emmy Award and a Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association. He is a 2014 National Humanities Medalist, multiple Emmy Award winner, MacArthur “Genius” Fellow and member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Nelson, a former professor of film in Morgan’s College of Liberal Art, is also co-founder of Firelight Media, a nonprofit production company dedicated to using historical film to advance contemporary social justice causes and to mentoring, inspiring and training a new generation of diverse young filmmakers committed to advancing stories of underrepresented people.

Nearly 1,000 candidates are expected to receive bachelor’s, master’s or doctoral degrees during the commencement ceremony. Morgan has awarded more than 50,000 academic degrees during its storied, 151-year history, propelling it to become the top-ranking university in Maryland in awarding degrees to African Americans.

Six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) has been named to participate in the Intel HBCU Grant Program. Intel has announced its three-year, $4.5 million program to encourage students to remain in STEM pathways at six historically black colleges and universities.

According to Intel, shaping a more diverse technology requires that we rethink our sources of talent and broaden our recruiting pipeline to access available diverse talent. As part of their commitment this program was introduce.  The participating HBCUs include Florida A&M University, Morgan State University, Howard University, Prairie View A&M University, North Carolina A&T State University and Tuskegee University.

As part of the program, $3.9 million will be awarded directly to the HBCUs and $600,000 will be used for workshops and activities that bring HBCUs and the technology industry together to ensure students are prepared with the relevant skills to enter the tech workforce.

The three-year Intel HBCU Grant Program supports multiyear investments in computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering programs, curriculum and labs, and has three components:

  • Scholarships: Two-year scholarships for students from college juniors to Ph.D. – level students with majors in computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering.
  • Student Experience: Providing computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering students with opportunities to participate in labs, workshops and research experiences.
  • Tech Industry Workshops: Workshops hosted by Intel that brings together HBCUs and the technology industry to equip students with the relevant skills to succeed in the technology sector.

The Intel HBCU Grant Program resulted from a collaboration between Intel and the HBCUs to address the historic gap in HBCU students pursuing STEM degrees. The National Center for Education Statistics reports that African-American students are more likely to switch out of STEM majors within their first year of college and only 11 percent of bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields are conferred to African-American students.

The Intel HBCU Grant Program is part of Intel’s $300 million Diversity in Technology initiative, which supports Intel’s bold goal of reaching full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in the U.S. workforce by 2020. In support of this goal, beginning in 2015, Intel increased the number of schools at which Intel recruit by 60 percent year over year. Intel also encourage more women and underrepresented minorities to enter and succeed in tech through programs and investments with organizations that include the National GEM Consortium, Georgia Tech, the American Indian Science and Engineering Society, the Hispanic Foundation of Silicon Valley, CODE2040, and Oakland Unified School District, among others.

Following the success of Intel’s other STEM pathway programs and being named a 2016 Top Supporter of HBCU Engineering Schools by US Black Engineer and Information Technology Magazine, Intel is excited to kick off their HBCU Grant Program and nurture the next generation of diverse talent that will lead us into the future.

To learn more about Intel’s diversity and inclusion efforts, visit www.intel.com/diversity as well as Intel’s 2016 Corporate Responsibility Report.