ATLANTA, GA – Beginning with the Fall 2019 semester The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) will offer a Master of Arts in Liturgical Arts and Culture Degree Program (MALC).

The MALC Degree Program focuses on the intersections of worship, arts and culture in an ever-evolving world. This degree program prepares students to serve as worship and or artistic leaders in a vareity of professional contexts across a broad spectrum of liturgical arts, including instrumental, vocal, and choral music, liturgical and West African dance, hip hop studies, and visual media and design.

The name change and broadened curricular emphasis come as a result of ITC identifying the need for interdisciplinary professional degrees that focus on areas outside of pastoral ministry.

The MALC Degree Program is different from other offerings at ITC because it focuses on liturgical arts in relation to culture and broadens the already existing emphases on church music. The degree draws expertise from faculty and the artist-in-residence, Gilbert Young, to provide a teaching-learning experience that equips students for engagement in liturgics in the church, academy, and the community at-large.

“I am extremely excited about our revised degree program, particularly because we’ve broadened it to include all liturgical arts and expanded its emphasis to include the impact and influence of culture on liturgy,” said Dr. Lisa M. Allen-McLaurin, Degree Coordinator and Helmar Nielsen Associate Professor of Church Music and Worship. “This will draw students who are not only artists and practitioners, but those whose focus is research on the effects of culture on liturgical history and development.”

Students applying to the MALC Degree Program are expected to exhibit artistic abilities and skills at an advanced level of proficiency in a liturgical art or academic research concentration. Admission to the MALC Degree Program will require either an audition in a liturgical arts concentration (i.e. musical instrument, choral conducting, composition, liturgical dance, dramatic arts, visual arts or liturgical design) or writing samples that exhibit a student’s scholarly writing and research abilities.

ITC currently offers four degrees, including a dual degree program, where students can learn alongside students from other denominations and share doctrines and perspectives on a daily basis. Their goal is to prepare leaders and visionaries who are in the community helping to create a better world… the “beloved community.”

For more information about the MALC Degree Program, contact ITC Director of Admissions, Natasha Jordan at njordan@itc.edu or (404) 527-7793.

###

About the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC)

Established in 1958, The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian Africentric ecumenical consortium of seminaries and a fellowship that educates students who commit to practicing justice and peace through a liberating and transforming spirituality to become leaders in the church, local and global communities. Its seminaries include the Morehouse School of Religion (Baptist); Gammon Theological Seminary (United Methodist); Turner Theological Seminary (African Methodist Episcopal); Phillips School of Theology (Christian Methodist Episcopal); and the Charles Harrison Mason Theological Seminary (Church of God and Christ). The Selma T. and Harry V. Richardson Ecumenical Fellowship provide theological training to students from various other faith traditions.

Rev. Dr. Edward L. Wheeler

ATLANTA, GA – The Interdenominational Theological Center’s President Rev. Dr. Edward L. Wheeler announced on April 26 that he is retiring from the role he’s held for the past four years. Wheeler made the announcement during a board of trustees’ executive meeting, on campus.

According to a press release from the University, Wheeler is the 10th person to serve in ITC’s top leadership role since its founding in 1958. Wheeler stated in his remarks to the board that he will be concluding his presidential position effective June 30, 2019, a position he has held since 2015.

The ITC board of trustees’ accepted the retirement letter with an expression of gratitude for Wheeler’s services.

“I have been blessed by mt time at ITC,” said Wheeler. My prayer is that new leadership will help ITC realize the unlimited potential. ITC’s liberating Africentric focus is needed now more than ever.”

Under Wheeler’s leadership, the institution has achieved several goals which include:

  • Probation with SACSCOC was removed, and its accreditation reaffirmed.
  • ITC received a $250,000 sustainability grant from the Lilly Endowment.
  • Enrollment has increased.
  • Curriculum revisions has been implemented.
  • Policies and procedures designed to increase institutional effectiveness have been put in place and;
  • admission standards have been raised.

“The tenure of Dr. Edward L. Wheeler at the ITC made a remarkable impact on the life of our community,” said Dr. Maisha Handy, ITC Provost. “He is a great mentor to many and a model of excellent leadership in theological education. He will be greatly missed even as we pray God’s blessing on his season of retirement.”

In addition to his tenure as President, Wheeler was an Adjunct Professor at ITC from 1977-1982 and was Dean of Morehouse School of Religion from 1982-1985.

“Transitions are essential part of life,” stated Wheeler. The world is changing, the church is changing, and theological education must be change to be relevant to the changes taking place all around us. I am confident the next generation of leadership for ITC will move the mission forward so that ITC will continue to prepare transformative leaders for an ever-changing world.”

ITC’s Board will spend the next two months identifying what the next President’s work will be. An interim will be appointed to assume the duties of the presidential office, and a search will be launched later this year.

###

About the Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC)

Established in 1958, The Interdenominational Theological Center (ITC) is a Christian Africentric ecumenical consortium of seminaries and a fellowship that educates students who commit to practicing justice and peace through a liberating and transforming spirituality to become leaders in the church, local and global communities. Its seminaries include the Morehouse School of Religion (Baptist); Gammon Theological Seminary (United Methodist); Turner Theological Seminary (African Methodist Episcopal); Phillips School of Theology (Christian Methodist Episcopal); and the Charles Harrison Mason Theological Seminary (Church of God and Christ). The Selma T. and Harry V. Richardson Ecumenical Fellowship provide theological training to students from various other faith traditions. Visit www.itc.edu for more information.