LOS ANGELES, CA – Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science (CDU) is a recipient of a $150,000 grant from Anastasia Beverly Hills (ABH). The grant is a part of a $1 million pledge made by ABH to fight against systemic racism, oppression and injustice in light of the civil unrest taking place throughout the nation as a result of the systemic and unjust treatment of African Americans.

The grant will support general University operations and community engagement efforts. Since beginning the pledge in June 2020, ABH has donated over a quarter of a million dollars to institutions such as NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund, Black Lives Matter, the Loveland Foundation and others.

“As founder of Anastasia Beverly Hills, it is my promise that the brand will remain a constant and vocal supporter of equality. We vow to use our platform and our privilege to amplify the voices of marginalized groups that deserve to be heard,” said Anastasia Soare, Founder. “We believe in Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science’s mission in fighting against health disparities among underserved, and fully support their commitment to community engagement.”

“We are deeply appreciative of Anastasia Beverly Hills for generous support and belief in our mission to educate diverse health professionals as well as our vision to attain a world without health disparities,” said Angela Minniefield, Senior Vice President of Advancement, Strategic Development & External Affairs at CDU. “Special thanks to our Alumni Relations and Corporative Giving manager Brittney Miller for facilitating this partnership, and we look forward to continuing a meaningful relationship with ABH through its community engagement pillar.”

###

About Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science
CDU is a private, non-profit student centered minority-serving medical and health sciences University that is committed to cultivating diverse health professional leaders who are dedicated to social justice and health equity for underserved populations through outstanding education, research, clinical service, and community engagement.CDU is a leader in health disparities research with a focus on education, training, treatment and care in cancer, diabetes, cardiometabolic and HIV/AIDS. For more information, visit www.cdrewu.edu.

Assistant Professor Siobahn Grady

North Carolina Central University School of Library and Information Sciences Assistant Professor, Siobhan Day Grady, Ph.D., has received a $190,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help improve the function of self-driving cars.

Assistant Professor Grady said she will use the grant, provided through the Historically Black Colleges and Excellence in Research program at the NSF, to analyze and identify problems encountered by self-driving vehicles. The data will become part of a $1 million NSF project to analyze problems encountered by self-driving vehicles, with the aim of detecting and reducing such incidents in real time.

“This research is very timely and relevant; it’s the future,” said Grady. “I’m excited to contribute to the field as well as provide research opportunities to students.”

Lead investigator on the overall project is Daniel Limbrick, Ph.D., an associate professor in the Department of Computer and Electrical Engineering at North Carolina A&T State University, where Grady become the first woman to graduate with a doctoral degree in computer science in 2018.

The researchers will analyze the fault-detection capabilities of autonomous vehicles and look for ways of improving reliability. Three types of faults will be examined: transient, which occur due to external factors, such as the environment; intermittent, where problems are known to occur on an occasional but regular basis; and permanent, which occur regularly because of a physical malfunction and must be corrected to achieve reliability.

The project will result in enhanced course options for students at both institutions, as well as outreach and engagement opportunities, Grady said.

“Dr. Grady is a pioneer in artificial intelligence and machine learning,” said Jon Grant, Ph.D., of the School of Library and information science. “Students in the SLIS graduate program in information science will gain high-demand skills by working with Dr. Grady to develop the next generation of vehicles that will be more intelligent and make transportation in our society safer,” Grant said.

Grady joined the faculty of NCCU in 2019 as assistant professor of information systems. She earned her master’s degree in information science at NCCU in 2009. She also holds a master’s in computer science from NCAT, where she was a Chancellor Distinguished Fellow.

In September 2019, Grant was honored by the If/Then Initiative and the American Association for the Advancement of Science as one of 120 national STEM ambassadors. Life-sized 3D statues of the female scientists will be unveiled this summer at NorthPark in Dallas as part of a $25 million initiative Lynda Hill Philanthropies to highlight female scientists and encourage more girls to enter the STEM fields.

###

About North Carolina Central University


North Carolina Central University, with a strong tradition of teaching, research, and service, prepares students to become global leaders and practitioners who transform communities. Through a nationally recognized law school, highly acclaimed and innovative programs in the visual and performing arts, sciences, business, humanities, and education programs, NCCU students are engaged problem solvers. Located in the Research Triangle, the University advances research in the biotechnological, biomedical, informational, computational, behavioral, social, and health sciences. Our students enhance the quality of life of citizens and the economic development of North Carolina, the nation, and the world. For more information, visit www.nccu.edu.

About the National Science Foundation


The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…” NSF is vital because it supports basic research and people to create knowledge that transforms the future. For more information, visit www.nsf.gov.
Talladega College’s band outside Foster Hall

TALLADEGA, AL – Talladega College has been awarded two African American Civil Rights Historic Preservation Fund grants from the National Park Service (NPS). The College will receive a $500,000 grant for its Foster Hall Interior Preservation, Restoration, and Rehabilitation Development Project, and a $50,000 grant for Talladega College and the Civil Rights Movement: A Watershed in History.

“This is extremely significant news for the College, for the community and for individuals throughout the nation who value the preservation of history,” said Dr. Bill C. Hawkins, President of Talladega College. “We recently transformed the campus by constructing three new buildings simultaneously. Now, thanks to the National Park Service, we will be able to begin renovating one of our most important historic buildings.”

Talladega’s Vice President of Institutional Advancement Seddrick T. Hill, Sr. added, “The $500,000 grant will help us restore Foster Hall, which was the heart and soul of the College for over one hundred years. The $50,000 grant will enable us to conduct research, document history and create educational materials that details Talladega College’s extensive role in the civil rights movement.”

Foster Hall was the first facility built specifically for Talladega College after the institution was established in 1867. Construction began in 1869 and was completed the following year. It was named in honor of Rev. Lemuel Foster,, a staunch abolitionist from Blue Island, Illinois, who donated most of the funds needed to construct the building. Foster Hall served as a residence hall for female students and faculty and included dining facilities for the entire school. it was the site for numerous civil rights planning meetings. The building closed in 1980 after a fire ravaged the interior. It has remained closed for four decades.

“Alumni still talk about their memories of Foster Hall. They reminisce about how beautiful the interior was, about what the building meant to them, and about its role in the civil rights struggle,” said Hill.

Funds from NPS for Talladega College and the Civil Rights Movement: A Watershed in History will aid Talladega in documenting stories about the College’s civil rights activities, including Talladega College’s 1961 march on Anniston, Alabama. The march was organized after Dr. Arthur L. Bacon, a Talladega College senior at the time, was assaulted at the Southern Railway Station in Anniston.

The National Park Service (NPS) is awarding $14 million in African American Civil Rights Historic Preservation Fund grants to fund 51 projects across 20 states and the District of Columbia.

###

About Talladega College

The oldest private Historically Black College in Alabama, Talladega College was founded in 1867 by two former slaves, William Savery and Thomas Tarrent. Talladega College is the home of the renowned Hall Woodruff Amistad Murals, which received rave reviews from the New York Times during a three year, eight-city tour. For more information, visit www.talladega.edu.

Morrison Hall, built in 1924, is one of the five buildings within the Agricultural and Technical College of North Carolina National Register historic district in Greensboro, North Carolina. The College will receive funding for its preservation.

WASHINGTON – The National Park Service (NPS) announced on April 24, 2020, $7.7 million in grants to 18 projects in 12 states for the preservation of historic structures on campuses of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). Since the 1990s, the National Park Service has awarded more than $60 million in grants to over 80 of the remaining active HBCUs, according to a press release by NPS.

“These grants help us to honor the legacy of HBCUs in serving our nation’s higher education needs,” said David Vela, National Park Service Deputy Director. “Funding awarded this year will help preserve 18 historic properties on HBCU campuses in 12 states, many of which are listed in the National Register.”

Projects funded by these grants will support the physical preservation of National Register listed sites on HBCU campuses to included historic districts, buildings, sites, structures, and objects. Eligible costs include pre-preservation studies, architectural plans and specifications, historic structure reports, and the repair and rehabilitation of historic properties according to the Secretary of the Interior’s Standard for Archaeology and Historic Preservation.

Congress appropriates funding for the program through the Historic Preservation Fund (HPF). The HPF uses revenue from federal oil leases on the Outer Continental Shelf, providing assistance for a broad range preservation projects without expending tax dollars.

Projects receiving grants this year will preserve stories, resources, and places like the Samuel T. Graves Hall at Morehouse College in Atlanta, GA; the University Memorial Chapel at Morgan State University in Baltimore, MD; and the Historic Carnegie Library at Livingstone College in Salisbury, NC.

For more information about the grants and the Historically Black Colleges and Universities program, please visit . Applications for $10 millions in FY2020 funding will be available in the fall of 2020.

Historically Black College and University Awards:

StateProjectsGranteeAward
Alabama
Fairfield
Williams Hall Historic Preservation ProjectMiles College$499,869
Georgia
Atlanta
Samuel T. Graves Hall Exterior Repair and Restoration ProjectMorehouse College$500,000
Louisiana
Baton
Rouge
Preservation of the Archives BuildingSouthern University and A&M College$499,938
Louisiana
Grambling
University Memorial Chapel Window PreservationMorgan State University $500,000
Mississippi
Jackson
Preservation of the Historic Mt. Olive CemeteryJackson State University$496,023
North Carolina
Greensboro
Dudley Memorial Building Renovation ProjectNorth Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University$500,000
North Carolina
Greensboro
Morrison and Murphy Hall UpdatesNorth Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University$266,068
North Carolina
Salisbury
Preservation of the Historic Andrew Carnegie LibraryLivingstone College$500,000
Ohio
Wilberforce
Conversion of the Power Plant to the Frank Murphy Student Success CenterCentral State University$500,000
Oklahoma
Oklahoma City
Historic Cottage Row District Preservation ProjectLangston University$473,820
South Carolina
Columbia
Pratt Hall Preservation ProjectBenedict College$500,000
South Carolina
Orangeburg
The SCSU Forensic Analysis/Assessment of Wilkinson Hall ProjectSouth Carolina State University$50,000
South Carolina
Orangeburg
Trustee Hall Preservation and Restoration InitiativeClaflin University$446,569
Texas
Tyler
The Rehabilitation of the D.R. Glass LibraryTexas College$500,000
Virginia
Lynchburg
Preservation of Humbles Hall Phase IIVirginia University of Lynchburg$499,713
West Virginia
Bluefield
President’s House Renovation ProjectBluefield State College – Applied Research Foundation of West Virginia$68,000
Total$7,760,00

About the National Park Service

About the National Park Service. More than 20,000 National Park Service employees care for America’s 419 national parks and work with communities across the nation to help preserve local history and create close-to-home recreational opportunities. Learn more at www.nps.gov.