DENMARK, S.C. – Voorhees College recently ended the fiscal year raising $1,150,850.35.

The Voorhees College National Alumni Association (VCNAA) contributed more than $200,000 this fiscal year. The association has generated $1M in funds over the last five years.

President W. Franklin Evans said Voorhees College alumni are second to non and one of the institution’s biggest supporters.

“Our alumni have been an intricate part in the success of the institution. They come through to assist whenever they are called upon giving from their hearts,” said Evans. “I salute our Tiger alumni family for what they have achieved.”

Also, during the fiscal year, Voorhees celebrated reaching 100% faculty and staff giving. Sarah Simpson, development officer for faculty/staff giving and church relations, said this has not been done before.

“Throughout the year, we created new avenues for faculty/staff appreciation and giving efforts. Strengthening affinity and commitments to the institution we all serve,” Simpson said.

The Division of Institution Advancement and Development under the direction of Vice President Dr. Gwynth R. Nelson, successfully surpassed the annual goal of raising $1M two fiscal years in a row. This year saw an increase in two of the institution’s signature events: UNCF Corporate and Community Lunchoen which raises more than $15,000 and the Presidential Scholarship Gala which raised approximately $200,000.

Nelson said Voorhees has had a successful 2018-2019 fiscal year.

“I would like to thank my team, all of the loyal Voorhees supporters, and President Evans’ vision.  We are already putting our resources together to launch several campaigns for the new fiscal year. Our capabilities will be limitless as we continue to begin, believe, and become Voorhees College,” said Nelson.

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About Voorhees College

Voorhees College is a four-year, co-educational, career-oriented liberal arts colleges affiliated with the Episcopal Church and the United Negro College Fund. Voorhees College is fully accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award bachelor’s degrees. For more information, visit www.voorhees.edu.

The campus of Voorhees College, a Historically Black College, located in Denmark, South Carolina. (Photo courtesy of the HCF)

DENMARK, S.C. – The United Thank Offering (UTO) of the Episcopal Church recently awarded Voorhees College $73,700 to assist with the Voorhees College Campus Community Initiative (VCCCI).

According to a press release from the University, the VCCCI is a two-part project that allows Voorhees to meet the needs of students and community by providing access to education and wellness limited in rural South Carolina. The institution will renovate a building to serve as an admissions center and will create a wellness and fitness complex.

The United Thank Offering is a ministry of the Episcopal Church that promotes thankfulness and service in the church. Known worldwide as UTO, the United Thank Offering grants are awarded on an annual basis for projects that address human needs and help alleviate poverty, both domestically and internationally in The Episcopal Church.

The focus of the 2019 granting process was “Go Crossing boundaries created by race, culture, and economics to create communities that listen deeply and learn to live like Jesus.” This year, the UTO Board received more than 75 applications and was able to fund grants to 33 projects.

Voorhees College President W. Franklin Evans said Voorhees would not have reached as many heights as it has without the support of the Episcopal Church. “It is an honor and a blessing to receive that financial assistance to rebuild the campus and the Denmark community. This partnership is strong and built on faith, Evans said. “With God in control, the boundaries will be limitless on continuing to make Voorhees a premier liberal arts institutions,” said Evans.

Voorhees College and Saint Augustine’s are the only Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) that supported by the Episcopal Church.

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About Voorhees College

Voorhees College is a private historically black liberal arts institution affiliated with the Episcopal Church, whose mission is to produce highly qualified graduates who coalesce intellect and faith in pursuit of life-long learning, health living, the betterment of society, and an abiding faith in God. For more information, visit www.voorhees.edu.

About United Thank Offering

The United Thank Offering (UTO) is a ministry of The Episcopal Church for the mission of the whole church. Through UTO, individuals are invited to embrace and deepen a personal daily spiritual discipline of gratitude. UTO encourages people to notice the good things that happen each day, give thanks to God for those blessings and make an offering for each blessing using a UTO Blue Box. UTO is entrusted to receive the offerings, and to distribute the 100% of what is collected to support innovate mission and ministry throughout The Episcopal Church and Provinces of the Anglican Communion. For more information, visit www.episcopalchurch.org.

DENMARK, SCVoorhees College continually holds the distinct honor of being the last institution standing that was founded by one of Booker T. Washington’s students.

Elizabeth Evelyn Wright, who was at the age of 23, began her studies at Booker T. Washington’s famed Tuskegee Institute. She said time at Tuskegee gave her a mission in life: being “the same type of woman as Mr. Washington was of a man.” Knowing the importance of education, she moved to Denmark and started the first of several schools in the rural area. She survived threats, attacks, and arson.

Wright went back to Tuskegee to finish her degree before returning to South Carolina to try again. Undeterred and envisioning a better future for blacks through education, she founded Denmark Industrial School in 1897, modeling it after Tuskegee. New Jersey philanthropist Ralph Voorhees and his wife donated $5,000 to buy the land and build the first building, allowing the school to open in 1902 with Wright as principal. It was the only high school for blacks in the area.

In 1947, the school became Voorhees School and Junior College. And in 1962, it was accredited as four-year Voorhees College.

Today, Voorhees College survives as a small institution that takes pride in its rich history and is dedicated to catering to student’s academic, professional, social, and spiritual needs in order to assist them in fulfilling their higher education goals. Dating back to Wright’s era, there has been a debate between those who follow the philosophy of Dr. Booker T. Washington and advocated education aimed at teaching job skills and those who believe, as Dr. W.E.B. Dubois did, that a liberal education would help young adults develop as leaders. The Voorhees curriculum today is a mix of the two views.

The institution offers each student a comprehensive general education experience coupled with a values-centered liberal arts environment that supports opportunities designed to help prepare students to function in a diverse and increasingly technology society.

 

Source: www.voorhees.edu/blog/voorhees-the-last-school-standing