It’s with heavy heart to learn of the passing of former Zoo Director Dr. Lester E. Fisher, who passed away at the age of 100 on December 22. He remarkably transformed the notion of what a zoo is during his 30-year tenure as zoo director of Lincoln Park Zoo in Chicago, emphasizing the importance of education and conservation while furthering animal welfare and care.

Under his 30-year tenure, Fisher emphasized the importance of educating the public about the role zoos serve in society as conservation powerhouses. Visiting the zoo became an educational journey. He also encouraged animal care staff to further their education and hired experts who had the proper knowledge to provide world-class care.

Chicago has lost one of its greatest giants of humanity, Dr. Lester Fisher. His magnificent life and treasures mean everything to the world and the space of zoology. He was the man with the plan, and he laid the foundation for what Lincoln Park Zoo is today, building the first Great Ape House. It graces his name Dr. Lester E. Fisher Center for the Study and Conservation of Apes, known as one of the world’s leading ape behavior and science centers.

Dr. Fisher, who had a affinity for gorillas, spent time studying in Africa. In 1976, the zoo opened the Lester E. Fisher Great Ape House, where it continues to work with lowland gorillas. Under Fisher’s leadership, Lincoln Park Zoo “was home to the largest gorilla population in North America.”

As Zoo Director, Dr. Fisher is also credited with transforming the zoo into a state-of-the-art institution by renovating animal buildings and habitats, improving education around the animals and increasing conservation efforts.

Dr. Fisher worked at Lincoln Park Zoo nearly 45 years, starting in 1947 and later serving as the zoo’s director from 1962 until he retired in 1992. He is noted as the zoo’s first veterinarian.

The HBCU Campaign Fund organization joins the Lincoln Park Zoo family in extending our sincere condolences and thoughts to the Fisher family and friends during this time. We are more than grateful for his remarkable life and the many he has influenced. May Dr. Fisher’s legacy continue to be honored in our hearts going into the New Year, and for Lincoln Park Zoo to continue to carry on with his cherishable contributions forevermore.

With sympathy,

Demetrius Johnson, Jr.
Founder, President & CEO

An alumna of CSU, National Leader in the Education Community and, Passion for Equity in Education, Makes Jackson a Natural to Address the Fall 2021 Graduates

Dr. Janice K. Jackson, CEO of HOPE Chicago.

CHICAGO, ILDr. Janice K. Jackson will deliver Chicago State University‘s (CSU) 386th Commencement address on Dec. 16, 2021. The ceremony at the Emil & Patricia A. Jones Convocation Center is the university’s first in-person ceremony since 2019 and its return to in-person classes.

Jackson, a CSU alumna and the former CEO of Chicago Public Schools, was recently tapped as CEO of a newly formed nonprofit named HOPE Chicago. Launched in September 2021, HOPE Chicago, designed as a two-generation scholarship organization, will focus on the elimination of educational and economic equity barriers by guaranteeing debt-free college and wraparound support services to HOPE Scholars and their parents. The organization will pay the full cost of college for Scholars who are Chicago Public School graduates in need and offer the same support to a parent or guardian who desires to commence post-secondary programming. Seven CSU students were selected to participate in the inaugural cohort of the program. HOPE Chicago will also provide counseling mentoring, and career guidance to high school students.

“As an alumna of Chicago State University, we are thrilled to have Dr. Jackson address this year’s graduates,” said President Zaldwaynaka (“Z”) Scott, Esq. “She is a renowned education leader and visionary with a personal passion for transforming lives through education.”

Dr. Jackson, holds a B.A. in secondary education and an M.A. in history from CSU. Jackson also holds an M.A. in leadership and administration and a Ph.D. in education policy studies and urban school leadership. She began her 22-year career with CPS as a social studies teacher and debate team coach at South Shore High School. She served as a high school principal, District Network Chief, and Chief Education Officer in 2017, she was appointed CEO of CPS. She was the first CSU alumna to serve in the position.

About Chicago State University
Chicago State University (CSU), founded in 1867, is the oldest public university in the Chicago Metropolitan area. The University’s five colleges offer over 70 undergraduate and graduate degree-granting and non-degree programs. CSU is committed to equity in education, serving as the only U.S. Department of Education-designated four-year Predominantly Black Institution in Illinois and ranked by a Harvard economist in the top 4% of public and private universities nationwide in supporting our graduates’ economic mobility. The University serves as a prominent civic space on the greater South Side of Chicago by hosting a multitude of athletic, educational, cultural, and recreational activities. The University is located near public transit that provides convenient access to the campus.

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Elliott Charles

CHICAGO, IL – Chicago State University (CSU) President Zaldwaynaka Scott, Esq. announced the hiring of Elliott Charles as the University’s Director of Intercollegiate Athletics. Charles has more than 14 years of intercollegiate athletics experience, including leadership positions at Clemson University and Florida A&M University.

Charles will join Chicago State on December 16, 2019. He will succeed Eric Hyman, who served as the Interim Director of Intercollegiate Athletics for the past few months.

“Elliott rose to the top as a candidate in our search for AD,” said Zaldwaynaka Scott, Esq., President of Chicago State University. “He understands the intercollegiate athletic program needs of our university and is passionate about his approach to student academic success and excellence.”

Charles comes to Chicago State after two year at Clemson University, a Division 1 Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) program, with 256 employees, 19 sports and 500 student athletics. As Associate Director for Compliance Services at Clemson, he is responsible for day-to-day operations of the department with direct oversight of compliance and student services for athletics. He is a faculty members in the Athletic Leadership Program in Clemson’s College of Education.

“I would like to thank President Scott for the opportunity to serve Chicago State University,” said Charles. “I have been a proud member of the Clemson Tiger family and will be forever grateful to have been part of such a rich tradition of student success and service to the community. My family and I are excited to join Cougar Athletics while ushering n our championship era.”

Prior to Clemson University, Charles served as Deputy Director of Athletics at Florida A&M University, Associate Director of Athletics for Compliance at the University of South Florida, Assistant Director of Athletic Compliance at University of Alabama and the Assistant Commissioner for Compliance in the Mid-American Conference.

Charles holds an MBA from Northern Illinois University and a master’s degree in Sports Management from Illinois State University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Business Management from the University of South Florida. He and his wife Stormie, are proud parents of two children.

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About Chicago State University

Chicago State University (CSU) is a public, comprehensive university that provides access to higher education for students of diverse backgrounds and educational needs. The university fosters the intellectual development and success of its student population through a rigorous, positive, and transformative educational experience. CSU is committed to teaching, research, service and community development including social justice, leadership and entrepreneurship. For more information, visit www.csu.edu.

[ Photo creds: http://historicphotoarchive.com/category/blog ]
Did you know? On August 3, 1957, lawyer, judge, politician, diplomat and clergyman Archibald J. Carey Jr., was the first African-American appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Chair of his committee on government employment policy, working to reduce racial discrimination.

The youngest of five children born to the Reverend Archibald J. Carey, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife, Elizabeth H. Carey, Carey Jr., was a native of Chicago, Illinois where he attended Wendell Phillips High School. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from Lewis Institute (now Illinois Institute of Technology) in 1928, as well as a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Northwestern University in 1932, and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1935.

He was pastor of Woodlawn AME Church in Chicago from 1930-1949 before moving to Quinn Chapel AME Church, Chicago’s second oldest Protestant church, where he served until 1967. Carey also served as Republican alderman of Chicago’s 3rd Ward (1947-1955) and an alternate member of the United States delegation to the Eighth General Assembly of the United Nations in 1953.

In 1966, Carey was elected as a circuit judge in Cook County, Illinois, a position he held at the time of his death in April 1981.

In 1952, Carey was one of the speakers at the Republican  National Convention which met in Chicago. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the 1963 March on Washington may have been influenced by Carey’s address, which concluded: “… from every mountain side, let freedom ring. Not only from the Green mountains and the White mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire; not only from the Catskills of New York; but from the Ozarks in Arkansas, from the Stone Mountain in Georgia, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia–let it ring not only for the minorities in the United States; but for … the disinherited of all the earth…–may the Republican Party, under God, from every mountainside, LET FREEDOM RING!”

CHICAGO, IL – Cordell Reed, an executive with ComEd and a longtime mechanical engineer, died on December 4, 2017, at the age of 79 after a long illness, said his wife of 27-years Bernice Reed according to Chicago State University.

Born on March 26, 1938, in Chicago, Illinois Reed grew up in a south side housing project and moved on to a remarkable career in Chicago’s corporate and civic communities.

He earned a Bachelor’s of science in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign in 1960; Reed became the third African-American with that degree from UIUC. He went to work for Illinois electric Commonwealth Edison (ComEd). He worked his way up through the ranks and became an executive in 1975, acting as the public spokesman for nuclear power as well as a department manager. Reed was promoted to senior vice president, serving in three separate departments. In 1994, he became ComEd’s ethics officer and the chief diversity officer in addition to maintaining responsibility for purchasing materials for the corporation’s ten fossil-fired energy-generating plants. Reed represented ComEd in a 1995 trade mission to South Africa before retiring in 1997.

A big supporter of higher education the Student Union Building at Chicago State University was renamed after Reed in 2001.

The Student Union Building at Chicago State University was renamed after the late Cordell Reed in 2001.

In 1988 the Black Engineer of the Year Awards honored Reed with a Lifetime Achievement Award, and later on, in 1993 the American Nuclear Society recognized him with a Tommy Thompson Award.

He has also been active in corporate America, serving on the board of directors for LaSalle Bank, the Walgreen Company, Underwriters Laboratories and Washington Group International. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, engineering honor society Tau Beta Pi, the National Technical Association and the Urban Financial Service Association as well as a fellow of the American Nuclear Society.

Reed leaves behind his wife Bernice and five adult children: Derrick, Brian, Steven, Michael, and Barry.

CHICAGO, IL – Join the Chicago Football Classic Scholarship Fund, Inc. in partnership with City Colleges of Chicago and Chicago Public schools as they co-sponsor a college fair featuring recruiters from over 25 HBCU’s and local colleges and universities. The students will be able to speak with representatives about admissions, financial aid (including the City of Colleges of Chicago Star Scholarship), testing, majors and more. The college fair will also feature a financial planning seminar presented by BMO Harris Bank.

The HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) organization and its Division of Recruitment is proud to join the Chicago Football Classic as a support service for the college fair in assisting students to choosing HBCU.

The CFC HBCU College Fair and Empowerment Summit takes place on Saturday, September 30, 2017 from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. at Soldier Field following by the football classic showdown with the Grambling State Tigers facing the Clark Atlanta Panthers with kick-off at 3:30 p.m.

Registration for the fair is free and you can sign-up your student(s) here. For other information regarding this year’s Chicago Football Classic and tickets, visit their website at www.chicagofootballclassic.biz.

CHICAGO, IL – UNCF Chicago office will host its annual “A Mind Is…” Gala which will honor Chicago Football Classic co-founders Everett Rand, Larry Huggins and Tim Rand on this Saturday, June 17th at 6 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Hotel.

This is a major fundraising event for the Chicago area office of UNCF, which serves students in Illinois and Wisconsin. Each year, UNCF recognizes the extraordinary contributions of individuals who have made significant contributions of time, talent and resources to support UNCF’s mission and work, and student scholars who have directly benefited from the generous support of area donors.

(left to right; CFC Co-Founders Everett Rand, Larry Huggins, Tim Rand). Photo creds: Chicago Defender.

This year’s honorees include the co-founders of the Chicago Football Classic (CFC) Everett Rand, Larry Huggins and Tim Rand who started the classic nearly 20 years ago. The CFC is a non-profit, helping students attend and graduate from HBCUs across the country. The CFC has its primary mission promoting long-term success of African-American youth, to achieve academic, personal and professionally oriented excellence, while attending historically black colleges and universities and throughout their future lives.

Honorees also include the chief executive officer and director of the University of Chicago Charter School and managing director of the University of Chicago Urban Education Institute Shayne Evans and Spelman College alumna D’Rita Robinson who is the founder of Chatty Guest, a free app that encourages collaboration, mentorship and global dialogue across disciplines; and to date, the app has been downloaded in more than 51 countries.

To read more about the honorees, visit UNCF Chicago website here.

Tickets are no longer available for this event, but you are still able to donate towards the event and causes of UNCF and its Chicago area office here.

 

 

 

 

la-mlkchicago-ct0021891118-20081104.jpg
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., struck by a rock during a march from 63rd Street and Kedzie Avenue to Marquette Park on Chicago Southwest side. [ Photo creds: www.latimes.com ]
It was 50 years ago that the civil rights movement moved to Chicago in the protest against the cramped and segregated housing conditions.

On January 26, 1966, King moved into an apartment on 1550 S. Hamlin Ave., on Chicago’s west side near Douglas Park. It is archived that King moved into the apartment “to dramatize slum conditions in the city.”

chi-150mlk20080827121212By late June, King announced a large rally and march that would take place at Soldier Field on July 10. Nearly 30,000 people gathered that day at Soldier Field to hear King’s speech, on what came to be known as Freedom Sunday:

“This day we must declare our own Emancipation Proclamation. This day we must commit ourselves to make any sacrifice necessary to change Chicago. This day we must decide to fill up the jails of Chicago, if necessary, in order to end slums.

This day we must decide to register every negro in Chicago of voting age before the municipal election. This day we must decide that our votes will determine who will be the mayor of Chicago next year.

This day, henceforth and forever more, we must make it clear that we will purge Chicago of every politician, whether he be negro or white, who feels that he owns the negro vote rather than earns the negro vote.”

Today in 1966, 50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., stepped into Marquette Park on Chicago’s Southwest side to lead a march of about 700 people. Black demonstrators were met by white fueled hostility. Bottles and bricks were thrown at them, Dr. King was struck by a rock. Afterwards he stated: “I have seen many demonstrations in the south but I have never seen anything so hostile and so hateful as I’ve seen here today.”

Forty-one people, including four juveniles, were arrested during the march and afterwards.

Throughout the summer, King faced the organizational challenges of mobilizing Chicago’s diverse African-American community, cautioning against further violence and working to counter the mounting resistance of working-class whites who feared the impact of open hosing on their neighborhoods.

By late August, Mayor Daley was eager to find a way to end the demonstrations. After negotiating with King and various housing boards, a summit agreement was announced in which the Chicago Housing Authority promised to build public hosing with limited height requirements, and the Mortgage Bankers Association agreed to make mortgages available regardless of race. Although King called the agreement “the most significant program ever conceived to make open housing a reality,” he recognized that it was only “the first step in a 1,000 mile journey”.

As today marks the 50th anniversary of the march, Chicago activists recalls the protesting and organizing as the Chicago Freedom Movement. Marquette Park will be home to the city’s only permanent memorial to King’s work.  On Saturday, more than 1,400 people have registered to retrace the steps of the half-mile march from 63rd street and Kedzie Avenue to Marquette Park.

 

 

AJCareyJr
[ Photo creds: http://historicphotoarchive.com/category/blog ]
Did you know? On August 3, 1957, lawyer, judge, politician, diplomat and clergyman Archibald J. Carey Jr., was the first African-American appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Chair of his committee on government employment policy, working to reduce racial discrimination.

The youngest of five children born to the Reverend Archibald J. Carey, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife, Elizabeth H. Carey, Carey Jr., was a native of Chicago, Illinois where he attended Wendell Phillips High School. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from Lewis Institute (now Illinois Institute of Technology) in 1928, as well as a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Northwestern University in 1932, and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1935.

He was pastor of Woodlawn AME Church in Chicago from 1930-1949 before moving to Quinn Chapel AME Church, Chicago’s second oldest Protestant church, where he served until 1967. Carey also served as Republican alderman of Chicago’s 3rd Ward (1947-1955) and an alternate member of the United States delegation to the Eighth General Assembly of the United Nations in 1953.

In 1966, Carey was elected as a circuit judge in Cook County, Illinois, a position he held at the time of his death in April 1981.

In 1952, Carey was one of the speakers at the Republican  National Convention which met in Chicago. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the 1963 March on Washington may have been influenced by Carey’s address, which concluded: “… from every mountain side, let freedom ring. Not only from the Green mountains and the White mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire; not only from the Catskills of New York; but from the Ozarks in Arkansas, from the Stone Mountain in Georgia, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia–let it ring not only for the minorities in the United States; but for … the disinherited of all the earth…–may the Republican Party, under God, from every mountainside, LET FREEDOM RING!”