I am Black history. I am Black excellence. I am Charlie Nelms, who is an educator and administrator. I served as the tenth chancellor of North Carolina Central University in Durham, North Carolina.

ured: Dr. Charlie Nelms and Dr. Lawrence A. Davis Jr., (Former chancellor of the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff) at UAPB Chancellor’s Spring Convocation 2010. Credits: Chandra Walker

I was born in Crawfordsville, Arkansas in 1946, and I enrolled at Arkansas Agricultural, Mechanical and Normal College (now the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff) on academic probation with an ACT of 4, where I graduated with bachelor’s in agronomy and chemistry in 1969. I earned a master’s degree in higher education and student affairs and a doctorate in higher education administration from Indiana University. I served as chancellor of Indiana University East from 1987 to 1994 and chancellor of University of Michigan-Flint from 1994 to 2001, during which I resolved a significant campus budget deficit and reversed a four-year enrollment decline. I then returned to Indiana University system as vice president for Institutional Development and Student Affairs. Since taking the helm at NCCU, I improve retention and graduation rates, I reorganized the University College to provide intensive academic support and skills training for underprepared freshman and sophomores. Two years into my chancellorship, U.S. News & World Report ranked NCCU as the top public historically black college and university in the nation. During the 2009-10 academic year, NCCU observed its centennial. The physical appearance of the campus has been transformed into redesigned green spaces and a dramatic overhaul of the Fayetteville Street corridor. A new nursing building and residence hall were under construction; a much-needed parking deck opened in August 2010.

In 2011, I published “A Call to Action”, a policy directive intended to spur a national dialogue concerning the revitalization of the historically black colleges and universities as an important sector of American higher education.

On July 26, 2012, after completing a five-year commitment to serve NCCU, I announced my retirement, effective August 6, 2012.

I am currently a contributing writer for The Huffington Post on educational issues and has founded Destination Graduation, a non-profit organization focused on increasing retention and graduation rates at the nation’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).

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Join HBCU Campaign Fund for Black History Month “I Am’s,” exhibiting the outstanding achievements of well-known Black individuals who has contributed to the Black community and beyond.

If you would like to contribute an “I Am” of your all-time favorite Black pioneer to be feature, you may e-mail your “I Am” to support@hbcucampaignfund.org.

 

 

 

The Kwesi Ronald Harris Division of Historical Records presents its 107 Days of HBCU History initiative that commemorates the founders and values of why historically black colleges and universities are relevant and very vital to the African-American community through its founding missions. The campaign will last for approximately 107 days until each HBCU history is exhibited. The campaign will also feature spotlight on notable alums and other historical facts that is found interesting and important to know and reflect on. The short history bio’s will be shared through the Div. of Historical Records social media handles and website at www.hbcucampaignfund.org/divisions/historicalrecords/107daysofhbcuhistory.

You can join in on the moment by submitting your favorite pictures or fact about your alma mater or favorite institution by using the official hashtag: #HCF107DaysofHBCUHistory

Day 1 – Lincoln University of Missouri

Lincoln Institute

Founded and contributed by members of the 62nd and 65th Colored Infantry, on January 14, 1866, Lincoln Institute was formally established under an organization committee. By June of the same year, it incorporated and the committee became a Board of Trustees. Richard Baxter Foster, a former first lieutenant in the 62nd Infantry, was named first principal of Lincoln Institute. On September 17, 1866, the school opened its doors to the first class in an old frame building Jefferson City.

In 1870, the school began to receive aid from the state of Missouri for teacher training. In 1871, Lincoln Institute moved to the present campus. College-level work was added to the curriculum in 1877, and passage of the Normal School Law permitted Lincoln graduates to teach for life in Missouri without further examination. Lincoln Institute formally became a state institution in 1879 with the deeding of the property to the state under the Second Morrill Act of 1890, Lincoln became a land-grant institution, and the following year industrial and agricultural courses were added to the curriculum.

The 62nd and 65th Colored Infantry Soldier Memorial on the campus of Lincoln University of Missouri.

In 1921, the Missouri Legislature passed a bill introduced by Walthall M. Moore, the first black American to serve in that body, which changed the name from Lincoln Institute to Lincoln University and create a Board of Curators to govern the university. The North Central Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools accredited the high school division in 1925, the teacher-training program in 1926, and the four-year college of arts and sciences in 1934.

Graduate instruction was begun in the summer session of 1940, with majors in education, and history and minors in English, history, and sociology. A school of Journalism was established in February 1942.

Members of the 62nd Colored Infantry contributed $5,000; and the supplemented by approximately $1,400, given by the 65th Colored Infantry. Today, Lincoln University serves a diverse clientele, both residential and non-residential, engages in a variety of research projects, and offers numerous public service programs in addition to providing an array of academic programs.

For more information about Lincoln University of Missouri, visit www.lincolnu.edu.

[ Photo creds: http://historicphotoarchive.com/category/blog ]
Did you know? On August 3, 1957, lawyer, judge, politician, diplomat and clergyman Archibald J. Carey Jr., was the first African-American appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Chair of his committee on government employment policy, working to reduce racial discrimination.

The youngest of five children born to the Reverend Archibald J. Carey, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife, Elizabeth H. Carey, Carey Jr., was a native of Chicago, Illinois where he attended Wendell Phillips High School. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from Lewis Institute (now Illinois Institute of Technology) in 1928, as well as a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Northwestern University in 1932, and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1935.

He was pastor of Woodlawn AME Church in Chicago from 1930-1949 before moving to Quinn Chapel AME Church, Chicago’s second oldest Protestant church, where he served until 1967. Carey also served as Republican alderman of Chicago’s 3rd Ward (1947-1955) and an alternate member of the United States delegation to the Eighth General Assembly of the United Nations in 1953.

In 1966, Carey was elected as a circuit judge in Cook County, Illinois, a position he held at the time of his death in April 1981.

In 1952, Carey was one of the speakers at the Republican  National Convention which met in Chicago. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the 1963 March on Washington may have been influenced by Carey’s address, which concluded: “… from every mountain side, let freedom ring. Not only from the Green mountains and the White mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire; not only from the Catskills of New York; but from the Ozarks in Arkansas, from the Stone Mountain in Georgia, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia–let it ring not only for the minorities in the United States; but for … the disinherited of all the earth…–may the Republican Party, under God, from every mountainside, LET FREEDOM RING!”

ORANGEBURG, SC – Fifty years ago, on February 8, 1968, the Orangeburg Massacre events happened in Orangeburg, South Carolina at South Carolina State University.  HBCU Campaign Fund organization and the Office of the President and CEO, Founder Demetrius Johnson Jr., stand in commemorates with the Orangeburg community in recognizing the martyrs whose lives were taken 50 years ago on that February night in 1968, which is such a significant event in the African-American and HBCU history.

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Pictured: Henry Smith, Samuel Hammond Jr., and Delano Middleton, the three men who were killed in the 1968 Orangeburg Massacre which took place on the campus of South Carolina State University (a historically black college and university located in Orangeburg, South Carolina).

 

In the fall of 1967, some of the black leaders within the community tried to convince Harry K. Floyd, the owner of the bowling alley to allow African-Americans. Floyd was unwilling to desegregate which resulted in protests in early February 1968.

On February 6, 1968, a group of students (approximately 200) from South Carolina State University entered into the bowling alley and left peacefully after they were asked to leave by Floyd. The next night more students led by John Stroman returned and entered the bowling alley. This time, there were police waiting for them and several students were arrested including Stroman. After the arrests, more students began showing up angry, breaking a window of the bowling alley and chaos ensured. Police began beating student protesters with billy clubs. That night, eight students were sent to the hospital.

On the night of February 8, 1968, students started a bonfire in the front of South Carolina State University’s campus. As law enforcement attempted to put out the fire, Officer David Shealy was injured by a thrown object. Shortly after (around 10:30 p.m.) South Carolina Highway Patrol officers began firing into the crowd of around 150 protesters. Eight Patrol Officers fired carbines, short guns, and revolvers at the protesters, which lasted around 10 to 15 seconds in an attempt to calm the crowd. South Carolina State students Samuel E. Hammond Jr., Henry E. Smith and high school student Delano Middleton (who attended the local Wilkinson High School) were killed, along with twenty-eight people who were injured in the shooting.

OrangburgMaasacre

In the aftermath of this event, the federal government brought charged against the State patrolmen in the first federal trial of police officers for using excessive force at a campus protest. All nine defendants were acquitted although thirty-six witnesses stated that they did not hear gunfire coming from the protesters on campus before the shooting and no students were found to be carrying guns.

In a state trail in 1970, the activist Cleveland Sellers was convicted of a charged of riot related to the events on February 6 at the bowling alley. He was the national program director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC).

South Carolina State University’s gymnasium is named in the memorandum of Samuel Hammond, Delano Middleton, and Henry Smith (S-H-M Memorial Center), the three men who were killed. A monument was erected on campus in their honor, and the site has been marked.

Each year since 1968, the University has held an observance to commemorate the lives of 18-year-old SC State students Henry Smith and Samuel Hammond Jr., 17-year-old high school student Delano Middleton. This often neglected and overlooked tragedy is not nearly as well known as the shootings at Kent State and Jackson State in 1970, although it had a profound effect on the Orangeburg community and surrounding area.

MarchonWashington1CHICAGO, IL – The HBCU Campaign Fund organization celebrates today which marks the 53rd anniversary of one of the largest political rallies for human rights demanding civil and economic rights for African-Americans in the United States, the March on Washington which took placed on August 28, 1963.

The march was organized by A. Phillip Randolph and Bayard Rustin, who built an alliance of civil rights, labor and religious organizations that came together under the banner of “jobs and freedom.”

Today the march was an important part of the rapidly  expanding Civil Rights Movement, which involved demonstrations and nonviolent direct action across the United States. 1963 also marked the hundredth anniversary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation by Abraham Lincoln.

A. Phillip Randolph, who was the president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, President of the Negro American Labor Council, and vice-president of the AFL-CIO.  Bayard Rustin was a leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, nonviolence, and gay rights.

“HBCU Campaign Fund (HCF) organization take a pause to stand to celebrate the 53rd anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom because not only  it was a historical event , but it symbolize for African-American social living in the United States of America”  said Demetrius Johnson Jr., President of HCF. “This day brought together members of all sorts of organizations, to unite as one to state that African-Americans are people as well who deserve the same equal rights as other races. It also marks the day that the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his “I Have a Dream” speech.”

Thousands travel by road, rail, and air to Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28. The march estimate number of participants of 250,000 people.

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The program included leaders Rev. Patrick O’Boyle, A. Philip Randolp, Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Mrs. Medgar Evans, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, James Farmer, Whitney Young Jr., Mathew Ahmann, Roy Wilkins, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., former Morehouse President Dr. Bejamin E. Mays.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., delivered his American dream, “But on hundred year later, the Negro still is not free. One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languished in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land. And so we’ve come her today to dramatize a shameful condition.”

Dr. King ends the speech with saying, “We will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro Spiritual:  Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

“As we live in today with senseless violence that continues to roll in the black communities among one another, we must inherent the events that was taken place and persons who lost their lives for African-Americans NO matter how long ago it took place to be more appreciative today to even be able to walk down the street and claim as a so-called “gang member”. said Demetrius Johnson Jr.”There was a time you could not even walk down the street freely. African-Americans lost lives in protests, marches and other events that was organized to fight for African-Americans to even live properly in the United States today.”

We must not forget employment discrimination, economic inequality, police brutality, voter suppression, and segregated schooling. Laws that keep African-Americans away from the voting polls. segregated schooling lead to the creation of Historically Black Colleges and Universities. Do we continue commit to Dr. King’s dream of unity?

The years following included the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Selma Voting Rights Movement. The first march took place on March 8, 1965, and lead to an even which become know as Bloody Sunday. On March 15, 1965, President Johnson presented a bill to a join session of Congress. The bill was passed on August 6, 1965, and signed by Johnson as the Voting Rights Act.

 

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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., struck by a rock during a march from 63rd Street and Kedzie Avenue to Marquette Park on Chicago Southwest side. [ Photo creds: www.latimes.com ]
It was 50 years ago that the civil rights movement moved to Chicago in the protest against the cramped and segregated housing conditions.

On January 26, 1966, King moved into an apartment on 1550 S. Hamlin Ave., on Chicago’s west side near Douglas Park. It is archived that King moved into the apartment “to dramatize slum conditions in the city.”

chi-150mlk20080827121212By late June, King announced a large rally and march that would take place at Soldier Field on July 10. Nearly 30,000 people gathered that day at Soldier Field to hear King’s speech, on what came to be known as Freedom Sunday:

“This day we must declare our own Emancipation Proclamation. This day we must commit ourselves to make any sacrifice necessary to change Chicago. This day we must decide to fill up the jails of Chicago, if necessary, in order to end slums.

This day we must decide to register every negro in Chicago of voting age before the municipal election. This day we must decide that our votes will determine who will be the mayor of Chicago next year.

This day, henceforth and forever more, we must make it clear that we will purge Chicago of every politician, whether he be negro or white, who feels that he owns the negro vote rather than earns the negro vote.”

Today in 1966, 50 years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., stepped into Marquette Park on Chicago’s Southwest side to lead a march of about 700 people. Black demonstrators were met by white fueled hostility. Bottles and bricks were thrown at them, Dr. King was struck by a rock. Afterwards he stated: “I have seen many demonstrations in the south but I have never seen anything so hostile and so hateful as I’ve seen here today.”

Forty-one people, including four juveniles, were arrested during the march and afterwards.

Throughout the summer, King faced the organizational challenges of mobilizing Chicago’s diverse African-American community, cautioning against further violence and working to counter the mounting resistance of working-class whites who feared the impact of open hosing on their neighborhoods.

By late August, Mayor Daley was eager to find a way to end the demonstrations. After negotiating with King and various housing boards, a summit agreement was announced in which the Chicago Housing Authority promised to build public hosing with limited height requirements, and the Mortgage Bankers Association agreed to make mortgages available regardless of race. Although King called the agreement “the most significant program ever conceived to make open housing a reality,” he recognized that it was only “the first step in a 1,000 mile journey”.

As today marks the 50th anniversary of the march, Chicago activists recalls the protesting and organizing as the Chicago Freedom Movement. Marquette Park will be home to the city’s only permanent memorial to King’s work.  On Saturday, more than 1,400 people have registered to retrace the steps of the half-mile march from 63rd street and Kedzie Avenue to Marquette Park.

 

 

AJCareyJr
[ Photo creds: http://historicphotoarchive.com/category/blog ]
Did you know? On August 3, 1957, lawyer, judge, politician, diplomat and clergyman Archibald J. Carey Jr., was the first African-American appointed by President Dwight D. Eisenhower as Chair of his committee on government employment policy, working to reduce racial discrimination.

The youngest of five children born to the Reverend Archibald J. Carey, a minister of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, and his wife, Elizabeth H. Carey, Carey Jr., was a native of Chicago, Illinois where he attended Wendell Phillips High School. He went on to receive a Bachelor of Science degree from Lewis Institute (now Illinois Institute of Technology) in 1928, as well as a Bachelor of Divinity degree from Northwestern University in 1932, and a Bachelor of Laws degree from Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1935.

He was pastor of Woodlawn AME Church in Chicago from 1930-1949 before moving to Quinn Chapel AME Church, Chicago’s second oldest Protestant church, where he served until 1967. Carey also served as Republican alderman of Chicago’s 3rd Ward (1947-1955) and an alternate member of the United States delegation to the Eighth General Assembly of the United Nations in 1953.

In 1966, Carey was elected as a circuit judge in Cook County, Illinois, a position he held at the time of his death in April 1981.

In 1952, Carey was one of the speakers at the Republican  National Convention which met in Chicago. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech at the 1963 March on Washington may have been influenced by Carey’s address, which concluded: “… from every mountain side, let freedom ring. Not only from the Green mountains and the White mountains of Vermont and New Hampshire; not only from the Catskills of New York; but from the Ozarks in Arkansas, from the Stone Mountain in Georgia, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia–let it ring not only for the minorities in the United States; but for … the disinherited of all the earth…–may the Republican Party, under God, from every mountainside, LET FREEDOM RING!”